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I have an array like this:

Array
(
    [1000] => Array
        (
            [pv] => 36
        )

    [1101] => Array
        (
            [1102] => Array
                (
                    [pv] => 92
                )

            [pv] => 38
        )

    [pv] => 64
)

How I can find the sum of all array elements with key 'pv', regardless of the depth at which they appear.

For this example the result will 36+92+38+64 = 240

Thanks for help.

share|improve this question
    
4  
The sum of those values should actually be 230 rather than 240 –  Mark Baker Sep 23 '10 at 12:06
1  
:) I have seen that array before –  xtofl Sep 23 '10 at 12:23

8 Answers 8

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Another alternative:

$sum = 0;
$array_obj = new RecursiveIteratorIterator(new RecursiveArrayIterator($array));
foreach($array_obj as $key => $value) {
    if($key == 'pv')
        $sum += $value;
}
echo $sum;

Update: Just thought I'd mention that this method uses the PHP SPL Iterators.


Salathe Edit:

A simple (relatively) way to filter the keys and to sum the values (without writing a custom Iterator) would be to do some filtering with a RegexIterator, convert the resulting iterator into an array and use the handy array_sum function on it. This is purely an academic exercise and I certainly wouldn't advocate it as the best way to achieve this... however, it is just one line-of-code. :)

$sum = array_sum(
    iterator_to_array(
        new RegexIterator(
            new RecursiveIteratorIterator(
                new RecursiveArrayIterator($array)
            ),
            '/^pv$/D',
            RegexIterator::MATCH,
            RegexIterator::USE_KEY
        ),
        false
    )
);
share|improve this answer
    
+1! This one is nice, too! It does not require an extra function and does not clutter up the namespace. I like it! –  jwueller Sep 23 '10 at 12:11
    
+1 for IteratorIterator I recently used this for directory traversing to find certain files with the RegexIteratorIterator. –  Chris Sep 23 '10 at 12:18
1  
+1: Plus, you could even toss in a FilterIterator and not have to worry about the `if($key == 'pv')``part... But this is on the mark either way... –  ircmaxell Sep 23 '10 at 12:27
2  
@ircmaxell,@erisco Cue ridiculous one-liner... $sum = array_sum(iterator_to_array(new RegexIterator(new RecursiveIteratorIterator(new RecursiveArrayIterator($array)), '/^pv$/D', RegexIterator::MATCH,RegexIterator::USE_KEY), false)); –  salathe Sep 24 '10 at 8:45
1  
Yeah, that's ridiculous. An awesome display of what you can do with SPL, but still ridiculous. –  ircmaxell Sep 24 '10 at 11:07
function addPV($array){
  $sum = 0;
  foreach($array as $key => $a){
    if (is_array($a)){
       $sum += addPV($a);
    }else if($key == 'pv') {
       $sum += $a;
    }
  }
  return $sum;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1! I hate passing function names as string as required for array_reduce(), etc. Nice and clean solution! –  jwueller Sep 23 '10 at 12:00
3  
@elusive: in PHP5.3 you can just pass anonymous functions (like javascript tends to do), maybe that's less creepy to you: $arr = range(1,40); var_dump(array_reduce($arr,function($v,$k){return $v+$k;})); –  Wrikken Sep 23 '10 at 12:05
    
@Wrikken: Thats right, but you cannot assume that PHP 5.3 is already running everywhere. AFAIK, 5.3 will ship with the next release of debian at the earliest. fredleys solution works nicely with currently used versions of PHP and i consider it less ugly than the array_reduce() method. –  jwueller Sep 23 '10 at 12:10
    
Afaik, 5.3.2 is in the testing branch, so in Debian terms that will be 'soonish', and I'm not disputing this is a nice solution (+1 'ed it), just reacted to your 'I don't like to pass function names as string' with some info you might be happy with in future in case you didn't know already ;) –  Wrikken Sep 23 '10 at 13:01
    
@Wrikken: Yes, thanks ;) –  jwueller Sep 23 '10 at 13:11

you can use array_reduce or array_walk_recursive functions and a custom call back function of yourself:

function sum($v, $w)
{
    $v += $w;
    return $v;
}

$total = array_reduce($your_array, "sum");
share|improve this answer
    
i like this way, but dont you need conditional to check that key is pv? could be other numerical values –  jon_darkstar Mar 10 '11 at 23:15

based on @Ali Sattari answer

function sum($v, $w) {
    return $v + (is_array($w) ? 
        array_reduce($w, __FUNCTION__) : $w);
}
share|improve this answer
$sum = 0;

function sumArray($item, $key, &$sum)
{
    if ($key == 'pv')
       $sum += $item;
}

array_walk_recursive($array, 'sumArray',&$sum);
echo $sum;
share|improve this answer
    
Works as long as there are nothing other than arrays and numbers with the key pv. –  Tom Medley Sep 23 '10 at 11:55
    
@fredley - if the OP has additional criteria (eg test for booleans, etc) they can easily be added to the sumArray callback function –  Mark Baker Sep 23 '10 at 11:57
$array = array('1000'=> array('pv'=>36), array('1101' => array('pv'=>92)));

$total = 0;
foreach(new recursiveIteratorIterator( new recursiveArrayIterator($array)) as $sub)
{
 $total += (int)  $sub;
}
print_r($total);
share|improve this answer
function SumRecursiveByKey($array,$key)
{
    $total = 0;
    foreach($array as $_key => $value)
    {
        if(is_array($value))
        {
            $total += SumRecursiveByKey($array,$key);
        }elseif($_key == $key)
        {
             $total += $value;
        }
    }
    return $total;
}

use like

$summed_items = SumRecursiveByKey($myArray,'pv');

This would give you more leeway in checking alternative keys a swell.

share|improve this answer
private function calculateUserGv($userId) {
    $group = $this->arrayUnder($this->_user_tree, $userId);
    global $gv;
    $gv = 0;
    $gv    = $this->gvRecursive($group);
    return;
}

private function gvRecursive($group) {
    global $gv;
    foreach ($group as $key => $val) {
        if ($key == 'pv') {
            $gv += $group[$key];
        }
        else {
            $this->gvRecursive($val);
        }
    }
    return $gv;
}
share|improve this answer
    
having global $gv, modifying it within the function, then return $gv is not nice. Invoking this function with $gv = $this->gvRecursive($group); is not nice at all. –  Tom Medley Sep 23 '10 at 11:54

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