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I've got a table created using this query.

CREATE TABLE `tbl_friends` (
  `friend_id` int(11) NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `friend_status` tinyint(4) NOT NULL default '0',
  `friend_id1` int(11) NOT NULL default '0',
  `friend_id2` int(11) NOT NULL default '0',
  `friend_date` datetime NOT NULL default '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
  `friend_confirm` datetime NOT NULL default '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
  PRIMARY KEY  (`friend_id`)
) TYPE=MyISAM AUTO_INCREMENT=10 ;

I want to view the list of my friends, for that I only need to know other user's id - numeric value stored in friend_id1 or friend_id2 rows. My problem is that I don't know if friend_id1 or friend_id2 contains required data.

Please help me create a query to receive the number of another user if my number is $_SESSION['id']

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What friend_id1 and friend_id2 stands for (exactly)? Because i cannot understand who is who. –  fabrik Sep 23 '10 at 14:22
3  
@fabrik - that's his problem too. –  jmucchiello Sep 23 '10 at 14:24
    
@jmucchiello :D –  fabrik Sep 23 '10 at 14:24
    
friend_id1 should stand for a person who invites for friendship and friend_id2 is that who accepts or denies it. My problem is how to know the other user's id if friendship can be offered as well as accepted and my id can simply be friend_id1 or friend_id2 –  Denis Bobrovnikov Sep 23 '10 at 15:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
CREATE TABLE `tbl_friends` (
  `friend_id` int(11) NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `friend_status` tinyint(4) NOT NULL default '0',
  `friend_id1` int(11) NOT NULL default '0',
  `friend_id2` int(11) NOT NULL default '0',
  `friend_date` datetime NOT NULL default '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
  `friend_confirm` datetime NOT NULL default '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
  PRIMARY KEY  (`friend_id`)
) TYPE=MyISAM AUTO_INCREMENT=10 ;

Would be like so:

SELECT * FROM tbl_friends WHERE friend_id2 = %d OR friend_id1 = %d AND friend_status != 0 ORDER BY friend_id

More Visual example:

SELECT
    *
FROM
    tbl_friends
    WHERE
        friend_id2 = %$1d
    OR
        friend_id1 = %$1d
    AND
        friend_status != 0
    ORDER BY
        friend_id
    DESC

Then just run it threw a sprintf function and your ready.

$sql = sprintf($sql,$_SESSION['id']);
share|improve this answer
    
You need parentheses around the OR conditions. Right now it says "all records with id2=$id" and "only these records with id1=$id if status is not zero". –  jmucchiello Sep 23 '10 at 16:02
    
Can you clarify what your talking about please, its hard to understand your point. –  RobertPitt Sep 24 '10 at 0:53

I'm not sure what you exactly mean, but I think your looking for something like:

select distinct * from tbl_friends where friend_id1 = $_SESSION["id"] OR friend_id2 = $_SESSION["id"];

If this is not what you mean, please add some additional information.

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1  
AND friend_status != 0 –  RobertPitt Sep 23 '10 at 14:29
    
+1 for mind-reading abilities (or i'm the only one who doesn't understand OP's question? :o) –  fabrik Sep 23 '10 at 14:32
    
Yeah, RobertPitt well done! –  Denis Bobrovnikov Sep 23 '10 at 15:05
    
fabrik, this is really a problem worth thinking about. Even I don't understand completely the way I can implement this in my web app. –  Denis Bobrovnikov Sep 23 '10 at 15:08

Something like:

 Select distinct(id) from (
      select friend_id1 as id from friends where friend_id2 = :my_id
      union
      select friend_id2 as id from friends where friend_id1 = :my_id
 )

There real problem here is keeping the table from getting weird data. You are better off always putting two records into the table for each reciprocal relationship. Then you only need to say:

select * from friends where friend_id1 = :my_id and status = :whatever 

If you do it this way, the control data for when friendship happens might need to move to another table

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protected by Kermit Feb 25 '14 at 15:10

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