Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

On Tuesday I had my exam on Java at the University. While I passed the exam (:D) there is one question to which I didn't answer correctly. There was this snippet of code:

class MyExc1 extends Exception {}
class MyExc2 extends Exception {}
class MyExc3 extends MyExc2 {}

public class C1 {
    public static void main(String [] argv) throws Exception {
        try {
            System.out.print(1);
            q();

        }
        catch ( Exception i ) {
            throw( new MyExc2() );
        }
        finally {
            System.out.print(2);
            throw( new MyExc1() );
        }

    }

    static void q() throws Exception {
        try {
            throw( new MyExc1() );
        }
        catch( Exception y ) {
        }
        finally {
            System.out.print(3);
            throw( new Exception() );
        }
    }
}

and I was asked to give its output. I answered "13Exception in thread main MyExc2", but the correct answer is "132Exception in thread main MyExc1". Why is it that? I just can't understand where does MyExc2 go :S Thanks to all

share|improve this question

10 Answers 10

up vote 43 down vote accepted

Based on reading your answer and seeing how you likely came up with it, I believe you think an "exception-in-progress" has "precedence". Keep in mind:

When an new exception is thrown in a catch block or finally block that will propagate out of that block, then the current exception will be aborted (and forgotten) as the new exception is propagated outward. The new exception starts unwinding up the stack just like any other exception, aborting out of the current block (the catch or finally block) and subject to any applicable catch or finally blocks along the way.

Note that applicable catch or finally blocks includes:

When a new exception is thrown in a catch block, the new exception is still subject to that catch's finally block, if any.

Now retrace the execution remembering that, whenever you hit throw, you should abort tracing the current exception and start tracing the new exception.

share|improve this answer
2  
«Based on reading your answer and seeing how you likely came up with it, I believe you think an "exception-in-progress" has "precedence"» Thank you...that was exactly my thought :) –  JustB Sep 23 '10 at 17:43

This is what Wikipedia says about finally clause:

More common is a related clause (finally, or ensure) that is executed whether an exception occurred or not, typically to release resources acquired within the body of the exception-handling block.

Let's dissect your programme.

 try {
            System.out.print(1);
            q();

        }

So, 1 will be output into the screen, then q() is called. In q(), an exception is thrown. The exception is then caught by Exception y but it does nothing. A finally clause is then executed (it has to), so, 3 will be printed to screen. Because (in method q() there's an exception thrown in the finally clause, also q() method passes the exception to the parent stack (by the throws Exception in the method declaration) new Exception() will be thrown and caught by catch ( Exception i ), MyExc2 exception will be thrown (for now add it to the exception stack), but a finally in the main block will be executed first.

So in,

 catch ( Exception i ) {
            throw( new MyExc2() );
        }
        finally {
            System.out.print(2);
            throw( new MyExc1() );
        }

A finally clause is called...(remember, we've just caught Exception i and thrown MyExc2) in essence, 2 is printed on screen...and after the 2 is printed on screen, a MyExc1 exception is thrown. MyExc1 is handled by the public static void main(...) method.

Output:

"132Exception in thread main MyExc1"

Lecturer is correct! :-)

In essence, if you have a finally in a try/catch clause, a finally will be executed (after catching the exception before throwing the caught exception out)

share|improve this answer
    
The catch is executed since q() threw an Exception from its own finally block. –  Péter Török Sep 23 '10 at 14:26
    
"In q(), an exception is thrown but before the exception is fully thrown, a finally clause is first executed, so, 3 will be printed to screen. " Er... no, the first exception thrown in q passes execution to the empty catch block in q (which swallows this exception), then to the finally block in q. Said finally block prints 3, then throws a new exception, which thanks to q's throws Exception is passed up the stack to the parent. –  Powerlord Sep 23 '10 at 15:19

Finally clause is executed even when exception is thrown from anywhere in try/catch block.

Because it's the last to be executed in the main and it throws an exception, that's the exception that the callers see.

Hence the importance of making sure that the finally clause does not throw anything, because it can swallow exceptions from the try block.

share|improve this answer
3  
It will also be executed EVEN if there is no exception thrown in try/catch block –  nanda Sep 23 '10 at 14:19
1  
+1: Direct and to the point without meandering down the entire stack which the OP already appears to understand. –  Powerlord Sep 23 '10 at 15:25

A method can't throw two exceptions at the same time. It will always throw the last thrown exception, which in this case it will be always the one from the finally block.

When the first exception from method q() is thrown, it will catch'ed and then swallowed by the finally block thrown exception.

q() -> thrown new Exception -> main catch Exception -> throw new Exception -> finally throw a new exception (and the one from the catch is "lost")

share|improve this answer

The easiest way to think of this is imagine that there is a variable global to the entire application that is holding the current exception.

Exception currentException = null;

As each exception is thrown, "currentException" is set to that exception. When the application ends, if currentException is != null, then the runtime reports the error.

Also, the finally blocks always run before the method exits. You could then requite the code snippet to:

public class C1 {

    public static void main(String [] argv) throws Exception {
        try {
            System.out.print(1);
            q();

        }
        catch ( Exception i ) {
            // <-- currentException = Exception, as thrown by q()'s finally block
            throw( new MyExc2() ); // <-- currentException = MyExc2
        }
        finally {
             // <-- currentException = MyExc2, thrown from main()'s catch block
            System.out.print(2);
            throw( new MyExc1() ); // <-- currentException = MyExc1
        }

    }  // <-- At application exit, currentException = MyExc1, from main()'s finally block. Java now dumps that to the console.

    static void q() throws Exception {
        try {
            throw( new MyExc1() ); // <-- currentException = MyExc1
        }
        catch( Exception y ) {
           // <-- currentException = null, because the exception is caught and not rethrown
        }
        finally {
            System.out.print(3);
            throw( new Exception() ); // <-- currentException = Exception
        }
    }
}

The order in which the application executes is:

main()
{
  try
    q()
    {
      try
      catch
      finally
    }
  catch
  finally
}
share|improve this answer

I think you just have to walk the finally blocks:

  1. Print "1".
  2. finally in q print "3".
  3. finally in main print "2".
share|improve this answer

Just a guess here, but the "finally" block is always executed. So, my guess is that since there is an exception thrown, in the finally block, that's the one that takes precedence.

share|improve this answer

I think this solve the problem :

boolean allOk = false;
try{
  q();
  allOk = true;
} finally {
  try {
     is.close();
  } catch (Exception e) {
     if(allOk) {
       throw new SomeException(e);
     }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
What problem are you going to "solve"? Do you mean the question in the exam? well it already answered. If you mean the problem of the given code, since it is just a exam question there is no sense to blame it out. –  Earth Engine Jan 9 at 21:49

It is well known that the finally bloc is executed after the the try and catch and is always executed.... But as you saw it's a little bit tricky sometimes check out those code snippet below and you will that the return and throw statements don't always do what they should do in the order that we expect theme to.

Cheers.

/////////////Return dont always return///////

try{

    return "In Try";

}

finally{

    return "In Finally";

}

////////////////////////////////////////////


////////////////////////////////////////////    
while(true) { 

    try {

        return "In try";

   } 

   finally{

        break;     

    }          
}              
return "Out of try";      

///////////////////////////////////////////

///////////////////////////////////////////////////

while (true) {

try {            

    return "In try";    

 } 
 finally {   

     continue;  

 }                         

} //////////////////////////////////////////////////

/////////////////Throw dont always throw/////////

try {

throw new RuntimeException();

} finally {

return "Ouuuups no throw!";

} //////////////////////////////////////////////////

share|improve this answer

Quoting from the JLS 8: 14.20.2. Execution of try-finally and try-catch-finally

If the catch block completes abruptly for reason R, then the finally block is executed. Then there is a choice:

  • If the finally block completes normally, then the try statement completes abruptly for reason R.

  • If the finally block completes abruptly for reason S, then the try statement completes abruptly for reason S (and reason R is discarded).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.