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I have a set of five boolean values. If more than one of these are true I want to excecute a particular function. What is the most elegant way you can think of that would allow me to check this condition in a single if() statement? Target language is C# but I'm interested in solutions in other languages as well (as long as we're not talking about specific built-in functions).

One interesting option is to store the booleans in a byte, do a right shift and compare with the original byte. Something like if(myByte && (myByte >> 1)) But this would require converting the separate booleans to a byte (via a bitArray?) and that seems a bit (pun intended) clumsy... [edit]Sorry, that should have been if(myByte & (myByte - 1)) [/edit]

Note: This is of course very close to the classical "population count", "sideways addition" or "Hamming weight" programming problem - but not quite the same. I don't need to know how many of the bits are set, only if it is more than one. My hope is that there is a much simpler way to accomplish this.

share|improve this question
    
Someone suggested that this could be accomplished with the new "Lambda Expressions" introduced in .NET3 - anyone care to comment? – Ola Tuvesson Dec 18 '08 at 15:09
1  
+1 for the bad pun. – Bill the Lizard Dec 18 '08 at 15:16
    
I just added an answer with Lambda goodness! – John Sonmez Dec 18 '08 at 15:35
    
Thanks, but I think Garry Shutler got there first... ;) – Ola Tuvesson Dec 18 '08 at 15:43
1  
Boolean or returns True if at least one value is True. The OP wants something that returns True if more than one value is True. – RobH Dec 19 '08 at 0:06

21 Answers 21

up vote 58 down vote accepted

How about

  if ((bool1? 1:0) + (bool2? 1:0) + (bool3? 1:0) + 
      (bool4? 1:0) + (bool5? 1:0) > 1)
      // do something

or a generalized method would be...

   public bool ExceedsThreshold(int threshold, IEnumerable<bool> bools)
    {
       int trueCnt = 0;
       foreach(bool b in bools)
          if (b && (++trueCnt > threshold)) 
              return true;
       return false;          
    } 

or using LINQ as suggested by other answers:

    public bool ExceedsThreshold(int threshold, IEnumerable<bool> bools)
    { return bools.Count(b => b) > threshold; }

EDIT (to add Joel Coehoorn suggestion: (in .Net 2.x and later)

    public void ExceedsThreshold<T>(int threshold, 
                      Action<T> action, T parameter, 
                      IEnumerable<bool> bools)
    { if (ExceedsThreshold(threshold, bools)) action(parameter); }

or in .Net 3.5 and later:

    public void ExceedsThreshold(int threshold, 
            Action action, IEnumerable<bool> bools)
    { if (ExceedsThreshold(threshold, bools)) action(); }

or as an extension to IEnumerable<bool>

  public static class IEnumerableExtensions
  {
      public static bool ExceedsThreshold<T> 
         (this IEnumerable<bool> bools, int threshold)
      { return bools.Count(b => b) > threshold; }
  }

usage would then be:

  var bools = new [] {true, true, false, false, false, false, true};
  if (bools.ExceedsThreshold(3))
      // code to execute  ...
share|improve this answer
    
To be really slick, have an override that accepts an action as well. – Joel Coehoorn Dec 18 '08 at 14:41
    
Suggestion - break the loop as soon as b > threshold. – Vilx- Dec 18 '08 at 14:43
    
+1 ExceedsThreshold, -1 first example. If you think you're being clever, you aren't. – user7116 Dec 18 '08 at 14:46
    
@Vix, kewl, thx, will make the change... – Charles Bretana Dec 18 '08 at 14:49
1  
sixlettervariables, what's wrong with the first example. I think it's simple and get's the job done. – Kevin Dec 18 '08 at 14:54

I was going to write the Linq version, but five or so people beat me to it. But I really like the params approach to avoid having to manually new up an array. So I think the best hybrid is, based on rp's answer with the body replace with the obvious Linqness:

public static int Truth(params bool[] booleans)
{
    return booleans.Count(b => b);
}

Beautifully clear to read, and to use:

if (Truth(m, n, o, p, q) > 2)
share|improve this answer
4  
The best answer +1 – Bent André Solheim Dec 18 '08 at 18:49
2  
Ah, if only more thought like us, Bent André. – Daniel Earwicker Dec 18 '08 at 19:20
3  
wow, +1 for readability – user7116 Dec 18 '08 at 22:11
    
I agree, this is a brilliant answer. I had 4 bools not in an array so ideally I wouldn't want to create an array. – Daniel Imms Jun 4 '12 at 23:25
1  
Agreed, brilliant answer. In case someone is looking for a solution that fits a general scenario, the @DanielEarwicker answer inspired me to this: static int MatchCount<T>(Predicate<T> match, params T[] objs) { return objs.Count(obj => match(obj)); }. To count number of positive values: double a, b, c, d; ... MatchCount(x => x > 0.0, a, b, c, d); And so on... – Anders Gustafsson Jun 20 '12 at 14:25

I would just cast them to ints and sum.

Unless you're in a super tight inner loop, that has the benefit of being easy to understand.

share|improve this answer
    
didnt see your response. i agree. – Victor Dec 18 '08 at 14:36
2  
Someone has to add the linq version of this: myBools.Cast<int>().Sum() ! – Jennifer Dec 18 '08 at 14:50
2  
@Jennifer a little late to this (!) but sadly Cast<int>().Sum() will throw an exception on a sequence of bools. Although you can cast bool -> int, you can't cast bool -> object -> int, which is what happens behind the scenes here. – Daniel Earwicker Jun 21 '12 at 8:16

It's time for the obligatory LINQ answer, which in this case is actually quite neat.

var bools = new[] { true, true, false, false, false };

return bools.Count(b => b == true) > 1;
share|improve this answer
4  
Or just Count(b => b) – Daniel Earwicker Dec 18 '08 at 15:31
    
Yeah, that works too, I just find my way a smidge clearer – Garry Shutler Dec 18 '08 at 15:34

I'd write a function to receive any number of boolean values. It would return the number of those values that are true. Check the result for the number of values you need to be positive to do something.

Work harder to make it clear, not clever!

private int CountTrues( params bool[] booleans )
{
    int result = 0;
    foreach ( bool b in booleans )
    {
        if ( b ) result++;
    }

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer

if you mean more than or equal to one boolean equals to true, you could do it like

if (bool1 || bool2 || bool3 || bool4 || bool5)

If you need more than one (2 and above) booleans equal to true, you can try

int counter = 0;
if (bool1) counter++;
if (bool2) counter++;
if (bool3) counter++;
if (bool4) counter++;
if (bool5) counter++;
if (counter >= 2) //More than 1 boolean is true
share|improve this answer

If there were millions instead of just 5 you could avoid Count()and do this instead ...

public static bool MoreThanOne (IEnumerable<bool> booleans)
{
    return booleans.SkipWhile(b => !b).Skip(1).Any(b => b);
}
share|improve this answer

from the top of my head, a quick approach for this specific example; you could convert the bool to an int (0 or 1). then loop through therm and add them up. if the result >= 2 then you can execute your function.

share|improve this answer

Shorter and uglier than Vilx-s version:

if (((a||b||c)&&(d||e))||((a||d)&&(b||c||e))||(b&&c)) {}
share|improve this answer
1  
Holy crap, that's horrible. – recursive Dec 18 '08 at 17:50
    
Yep, its horrible but it works (I have verified all combinations). – some Dec 19 '08 at 3:23

Casting to ints and summing should work, but it's a bit ugly and in some languages may not be possible.

How about something like

int count = (bool1? 1:0) + (bool2? 1:0) + (bool3? 1:0) + (bool4? 1:0) + (bool5? 1:0);

Or if you don't care about space, you could just precompute the truth table and use the bools as indices:

if (morethanone[bool1][bool2][bool3][bool4][bool5]) {
 ... do something ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
The first part's good, the second part scares me. – LeppyR64 Dec 18 '08 at 14:52
    
yes me too. lol. in some cases precomputing helps performance - though I don't think this is one of them :-) – frankodwyer Dec 18 '08 at 14:56

I would do something like this, using the params argument.

        public void YourFunction()
        {
            if(AtLeast2AreTrue(b1, b2, b3, b4, b5))
            {
                // do stuff
            }
        }

        private bool AtLeast2AreTrue(params bool[] values)
        {
            int trueCount = 0;
            for(int index = 0; index < values.Length || trueCount >= 2; index++)
            {
                if(values[index])
                    trueCount++;
            }

            return trueCount > 2;

        }
share|improve this answer
    
you can reduce that if statement to : return trueCount >= 2 – frankodwyer Dec 18 '08 at 14:53
    
also, I'm not sure this particularly meets the definition of "elegant" – stephenbayer Dec 18 '08 at 14:59
    
@frankodwyer Thats true, I changed it. I thought it might be more readable with the true, false, but looking at it again the other is definitely better. – John Sonmez Dec 18 '08 at 15:00
if (NumberOfTrue(new List<bool> { bool1, bool2, bool3, bool4 }) >= 2)
{
    // do stuff
}

int NumberOfTrue(IEnumerable<bool> bools)
{
    return bools.Count(b => b);
}
share|improve this answer

Not exactly pretty... but here's another way to do it:

if (
    (a && (b || c || d || e)) ||
    (b && (c || d || e)) ||
    (c && (d || e)) ||
    (d && e)
)
share|improve this answer
    
You weren't kidding :D – LeppyR64 Dec 18 '08 at 14:53
    
What about (a && (b || c || d || e)) || (b & ( c || d || 3)) || (c && (d || e)) || (d && e) ? – stephenbayer Dec 18 '08 at 14:56
    
i flubbed at a few points, but I think the logic is clear – stephenbayer Dec 18 '08 at 14:57
1  
Nice...I might use this as an interview question... "What does this do?" to measure pure intellect, and "What do you think of it as a solution?" to weed out anyone that liked it. – ChrisA Dec 18 '08 at 15:31
    
Hehe. :D But thanks for the idea! :) – Vilx- Dec 18 '08 at 15:33

I have a much much better one now and very short!

bool[] bools = { b1, b2, b3, b4, b5 };
if (bools.Where(x => x).Count() > 1)
{
   //do stuff
}
share|improve this answer
2  
A few people already wrote that one, albeit with the predicate passed to Count instead of needing the Where. – Daniel Earwicker Dec 18 '08 at 15:48

While I like LINQ, there are some holes in it, like this problem.

Doing a count is fine in general, but can become an issue when the items your counting take a while to calculate/retrieve.

The Any() extension method is fine if you just want to check for any, but if you want to check for at least there's no built in function that will do it and be lazy.

In the end, I wrote a function to return true if there are at least a certain number of items in the list.

public static bool AtLeast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int number)
{
    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");

    int count = 0;
    using (IEnumerator<T> data = source.GetEnumerator())
        while (count < number && data.MoveNext())
        {
            count++;
        }
    return count == number;
}

To use:

var query = bools.Where(b => b).AtLeast(2);

This has the benefit of not needing to evaluate all the items before returning a result.

[Plug] My project, NExtension contains AtLeast, AtMost and overrides that allow you to mix in the predicate with the AtLeast/Most check. [/Plug]

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If your flags are packed into one word then Michael Burr's solution will work. However, the loop is not necessary:

int moreThanOneBitSet( unsigned int v)
{
    return (v & (v - 1)) != 0;
}

example

 v (binary) | v - 1 | v&(v-1) | result
------------+-------+---------+--------
       0000 |  1111 |    0000 |  false
       0001 |  0000 |    0000 |  false
       0010 |  0001 |    0000 |  false
       0011 |  0010 |    0010 |   true
       .... |  .... |    .... |   ....
       1000 |  0111 |    0000 |  false
       1001 |  1000 |    1000 |   true
       1010 |  1001 |    1000 |   true
       1011 |  1010 |    1010 |   true
       1100 |  1011 |    1000 |   true
       1101 |  1100 |    1100 |   true
       1110 |  1101 |    1100 |   true
       1111 |  1110 |    1110 |   true
share|improve this answer

In most languages true is equivalent to a non-zero value while false is zero. I don't have exact syntax for you, but in pseudo code, what about:

if ((bool1 * 1) + (bool2 * 1) + (bool3 * 1) > 2)
{
    //statements here
}
share|improve this answer
    
Not valid in any language where true is equivalent to any non-zero value. (The example only works if 1 is always used for true.) – RobH Dec 19 '08 at 0:26

If you only have five different values, you can easily do the test by packing the bits in to a short or an int and checking to see if it is any of the zero or one bit answers. The only invalid numbers you could get would be..

0x 0000 0000 
0x 0000 0001
0x 0000 0010
0x 0000 0100
0x 0000 1000
0x 0001 0000

This gives you six values to search for, put them in a lookup table and if it's not in there, you have your answer.

This gives you a simple answer.

   public static boolean moreThan1BitSet(int b)
   {
      final short multiBitLookup[] = { 
            1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0,
            1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
            0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
            1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
            0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
      };
      if(multiBitLookup[b] == 1)
         return false;
      return true;
   }

This doesn't scale well past 8 bits, but you only have five.

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if((b1.CompareTo( false ) + b2.CompareTo( false ) + b3.CompareTo( false ) + ...) > 1)

// More than one of them are true

...

else

...

share|improve this answer

You mentioned

One interesting option is to store the booleans in a byte, do a right shift and compare with the original byte. Something like if (myByte && (myByte >> 1))

I don't think that expression will give you the result you want (at least using C semantics, since the expression is not valid C#):

If (myByte == 0x08), then the expression will return true even though there's only one bit set.

If you meant "if (myByte & (myByte >> 1))" then if (myByte == 0x0a) the expression will return false even though there are 2 bits set.

But here are some techniques for counting the number of bits in a word:

Bit Twiddling Hacks - Counting bits

A variation you might consider is to use Kernighan's counting method, but bail out early since you only need to know if there's more than one bit set:

int moreThanOneBitSet( unsigned int v)
{
    unsigned int c; // c accumulates the total bits set in v

    for (c = 0; v && (c <= 1); c++)
    {
      v &= v - 1; // clear the least significant bit set
    }

    return (c > 1);
}

Of course, using a lookup table's not a bad option either.

share|improve this answer

I was recently having this same issue, where I had three boolean values, which I needed to check that only 1 of them was true at a time. For this I used the xor operator as follows:

bool a = true;
bool b = true;
bool c = false;

if (a || b || c)
{
    if (a ^ b ^ c){
        //Throw Error
    }
}

This code will throw an error as a and b are both true.

For reference: http://www.dotnetperls.com/xor

I have only just found the xor operator in C# if anyone knows of any pit falls of this strategy, please let me know.

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