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I am working with a SMS handling, java based software and want to play a beep / alert sound whenever we receive a message. I tried looking at the java.sound libraries and could not find anything. I do not know if going the applet way of playing a sound will be okay in a java application! Are there any predefined sounds in any java libraries which we can call in an application? Any pointers will be appreciated!

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5 Answers 5

If you just want a beep or quick alert try

Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().beep();
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You can generate your own sound if you looking for something less boring than a beep() without an external sound file.

import javax.sound.sampled.*;

public class SoundUtils {

  public static float SAMPLE_RATE = 8000f;

  public static void tone(int hz, int msecs) 
     throws LineUnavailableException 
  {
     tone(hz, msecs, 1.0);
  }

  public static void tone(int hz, int msecs, double vol)
      throws LineUnavailableException 
  {
    byte[] buf = new byte[1];
    AudioFormat af = 
        new AudioFormat(
            SAMPLE_RATE, // sampleRate
            8,           // sampleSizeInBits
            1,           // channels
            true,        // signed
            false);      // bigEndian
    SourceDataLine sdl = AudioSystem.getSourceDataLine(af);
    sdl.open(af);
    sdl.start();
    for (int i=0; i < msecs*8; i++) {
      double angle = i / (SAMPLE_RATE / hz) * 2.0 * Math.PI;
      buf[0] = (byte)(Math.sin(angle) * 127.0 * vol);
      sdl.write(buf,0,1);
    }
    sdl.drain();
    sdl.stop();
    sdl.close();
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    SoundUtils.tone(1000,100);
    Thread.sleep(1000);
    SoundUtils.tone(100,1000);
    Thread.sleep(1000);
    SoundUtils.tone(5000,100);
    Thread.sleep(1000);
    SoundUtils.tone(400,500);
    Thread.sleep(1000);
    SoundUtils.tone(400,500, 0.2);

  }
}

More sound experiments here : Produce special sound effect

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You can take a look at the beep method within the Toolkit class, as shown here

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If you want to use the sound package to play an arbitrary sound file, you can use the javax.sound.sampled package. Here is the code that will play a sound file:

private void playSound(File f) {
    Runnable r = new Runnable() {
        private File f;

        public void run() {
            playSoundInternal(this.f);
        }

        public Runnable setFile(File f) {
            this.f = f;
            return this;
        }
    }.setFile(f);

    new Thread(r).start();
}

private void playSoundInternal(File f) {
    try {
        AudioInputStream audioInputStream = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(f);
        try {
            Clip clip = AudioSystem.getClip();
            clip.open(audioInputStream);
            try {
                clip.start();
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(100);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
                clip.drain();
            } finally {
                clip.close();
            }
        } catch (LineUnavailableException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } finally {
            audioInputStream.close();
        }
    } catch (UnsupportedAudioFileException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
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Can you explain why we need the thread to sleep after calling clip.start()? –  lucks May 11 '11 at 1:19
    
It's been a while since I wrote this code, but my guess is that it would probably work just as well with a Thread.yield(). –  Erick Robertson May 11 '11 at 17:05
    
I was referring to why we need to block in the first place, but I realized it's probably because we'd close the line before it finishes playing –  lucks May 11 '11 at 19:42
    
I think you actually needed to pass back to system resources in order for the clip to actually start. –  Erick Robertson May 12 '11 at 11:43
    
Yes, it would close the line before it finishes playing. –  Erick Robertson Jul 14 '11 at 21:02

The applet route should be fine (and is very straightforward). To avoid creating an Applet instance you can use the static newAudioClip method, and then call play() on the AudioClip created.

URL url = getClass().getResource("/foo/bar/sound.wav");
AudioClip clip = Applet.newAudioClip(url);
clip.play();
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