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I just want a quick and dirty non-modal, non-closable screen that pops up and goes away to make 2 seconds seem more like... 1 second. Using 3-5 lines of code.

Is this too much to ask?

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"...easiest way to write..." & "code-golf" - is it possible to do both at the same time? just wondering... –  eumiro Sep 23 '10 at 18:42
    
yeah, maybe the tags are incongruous. By easy to write, I mean, not requiring making a new form. You could say the same thing about [Delphi] and [Code-Golf] –  Peter Turner Sep 23 '10 at 18:47
    
This is not Code-Golf. Please read the [ Code-Golf About Page ](stackoverflow.com/tags/code-golf/info). –  Peter Ajtai Sep 23 '10 at 19:25
    
Good point, Delphi Challenge is NOT a contradiction in terms. –  Peter Turner Sep 23 '10 at 19:35

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you want to do everything programmatically (that is, if you do not want to design your form in the Delphi form designer), than you can write

type
  TStatusWindowHandle = type HWND;

function CreateStatusWindow(const Text: string): TStatusWindowHandle;
var
  FormWidth,
  FormHeight: integer;
begin
  FormWidth := 400;
  FormHeight := 164;
  result := CreateWindow('STATIC',
                         PChar(Text),
                         WS_OVERLAPPED or WS_POPUPWINDOW or WS_THICKFRAME or SS_CENTER or SS_CENTERIMAGE,
                         (Screen.Width - FormWidth) div 2,
                         (Screen.Height - FormHeight) div 2,
                         FormWidth,
                         FormHeight,
                         Application.MainForm.Handle,
                         0,
                         HInstance,
                         nil);
  ShowWindow(result, SW_SHOWNORMAL);
  UpdateWindow(result);
end;

procedure RemoveStatusWindow(StatusWindow: TStatusWindowHandle);
begin
  DestroyWindow(StatusWindow);
end;

in a new unit. Then you can always call these functions like this:

procedure TForm3.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  status: TStatusWindowHandle;
begin
  status := CreateStatusWindow('Please Wait...');
  try
    Sleep(2000);
  finally
    RemoveStatusWindow(status);
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, that looked totally Delphi –  Peter Turner Sep 23 '10 at 19:57
    
That will always show a form in the centre of the primary monitor, even when the form from which it is shown is on another monitor. There hasn't been any place for Screen.Width and Screen.Height since the Delphi 4 VCL which introduced Screen.Monitors. The code also ignores the task bar area. Passing a form and centring on that would be so much better... –  mghie Sep 25 '10 at 4:01
    
@mghie: Yes, you could center it over the desktop of the main form, the desktop of the active form, or you could center it over the active form. You could also change the colour of the status window and the font of the status text if you'd like. My code above only displays the principal approach, as I think a solution at SO should do in a case like this. –  Andreas Rejbrand Sep 25 '10 at 11:36
    
@Andreas: No. A solution on SO should promote good practices. Clinging to stuff that may have been a good idea in the time of single 800 x 600 monitors doesn't do that. It's a sore spot for me, I've been suffering badly written (not multi-monitor-aware) software for so many years now... –  mghie Sep 25 '10 at 13:40
2  
@Sam: No, I don't. Except for the code I write at SO, I do not expect anyone else to read my code. All programming projects I work on are exclusively my personal projects, and they are not even open source. Although, personally, I don't think the Windows API is 'difficult'; on the contrary, I think that anyone writing applications for the Microsoft Windows operating system should be fluent in the Win API. Secondly, I think the code above is beautiful. Writing concise code is a form of art, and personally, I find 'low-level' to be attractive. Sue me. (If you don't like it, dont upvote it!) –  Andreas Rejbrand Apr 19 '11 at 1:04

I generally have a TPanel with a 'Please wait' caption centered on my form, on top of everything, with Visibe set to false. When I start a job, I set Visible to true (optionally calling update to be sure it gets drawn), and to false afterwards (ideally in a finally clause).

If the code that does the work allows for some code to get run inbetween, you could start by timing for a second (or some other intercal) and only then set Visible to true, optionally updating process information and calling the form's Update to be sure the changes get drawn to the screen.

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That's a good idea for a dialog. I should have mentioned that I'm doing this on the main parent MDI form. –  Peter Turner Sep 23 '10 at 18:53
1  
@Peter: Any particular reason why? MDI has been deprecated for over a decade now. –  Mason Wheeler Sep 23 '10 at 18:55
    
@Mason: I sort of like MDI applications, and Excel for one is still one of those. –  Andreas Rejbrand Sep 23 '10 at 19:06
    
Are you calling my 99,999 dollar a seat app depricated? HarHarHar. Yeah, hopefully we'll figure something out when we go to Delphi 2009 in the next version - been pushing that off for 2 years now! –  Peter Turner Sep 23 '10 at 19:08
    
This can be even "easier" in a MDI app, as any panels on the main form will paint above the MDI children. Create a pair of methods to show and hide the panel. –  Gerry Coll Sep 23 '10 at 21:36

I usually add a form to the project, like this:

dfm:

object WaitForm: TWaitForm
  Left = 0
  Top = 0
  AlphaBlend = True
  AlphaBlendValue = 230
  BorderIcons = []
  BorderStyle = bsNone
  Caption = 'Please wait...'
  ClientHeight = 112
  ClientWidth = 226
  Color = clBtnFace
  Font.Charset = DEFAULT_CHARSET
  Font.Color = clWindowText
  Font.Height = -11
  Font.Name = 'Tahoma'
  Font.Style = []
  OldCreateOrder = False
  Position = poMainFormCenter
  OnCloseQuery = FormCloseQuery
  PixelsPerInch = 96
  TextHeight = 13
  object Panel1: TPanel
    Left = 0
    Top = 0
    Width = 226
    Height = 112
    Align = alClient
    BevelInner = bvLowered
    Caption = 'Please wait...'
    Color = clSkyBlue
    ParentBackground = False
    TabOrder = 0
  end
end

while unit looks like this:

interface

uses
  Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Variants, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms,
  Dialogs, ExtCtrls, StdCtrls;

type
  TWaitForm = class(TForm)
    Panel1: TPanel;
    procedure FormCloseQuery(Sender: TObject; var CanClose: Boolean);
  private
    { Private declarations }
    FCanClose: Boolean;
  public
    { Public declarations }
    class function ShowWaitForm: TWaitForm;
    procedure AllowClose;
  end;

var
  WaitForm: TWaitForm;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

{ TWaitForm }

procedure TWaitForm.AllowClose;
begin
  FCanClose := True;
end;

procedure TWaitForm.FormCloseQuery(Sender: TObject; var CanClose: Boolean);
begin
  CanClose := FCanClose;
end;

class function TWaitForm.ShowWaitForm: TWaitForm;
begin
  Result := Self.Create(Application);
  Result.Show;
  Result.Update;
end;

end.

you call it like this:

procedure TForm2.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  I: Integer;
begin
  with TWaitForm.ShowWaitForm do
    try
      for I := 1 to 100 do
        Sleep(30);
    finally
      AllowClose;
      Free;
    end;
end;

just an idea, refinements is up to you.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why bother with AllowClose if you free the object the next millisecond?! –  Andreas Rejbrand Sep 23 '10 at 18:29
    
@Andreas: This is a simplification of a more complex form I use in real programs... maybe it's unnecessary here, I just didn't check. As said before, this is just an idea... –  jachguate Sep 23 '10 at 23:22
    
@Andreas: BTW... there's a great chance it occurs not the next, but the very same millisecond... LOL :D –  jachguate Sep 23 '10 at 23:43

I show a hint for a quick message, sth. like this:

function ShowHintMsg(Form: TForm; Hint: string): THintWindow;
var
  Rect: TRect;
begin
  Result := THintWindow.Create(nil);
  Result.Canvas.Font.Size := Form.Font.Size * 2;
  Rect := Result.CalcHintRect(Form.Width, Hint, nil);
  OffsetRect(Rect, Form.Left + (Form.Width - Rect.Right) div 2,
                   Form.Top + (Form.Height - Rect.Bottom) div 2);
  Result.ActivateHint(Rect, Hint);

// due to a bug/design in THintWindow.ActivateHint, might not be
// necessary with some versions.
  Result.Repaint;
end;

procedure HideHintMsg(HintWindow: THintWindow);
begin
  try
    HintWindow.ReleaseHandle;
  finally
    HintWindow.Free;
  end;
end;

procedure TForm1.Button3Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  HintWindow: THintWindow;
begin
  HintWindow := ShowHintMsg(Self, 'Please Wait...');
  try

    Sleep(2000);  // do processing.

  finally
    HideHintMsg(HintWindow);
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer

If your application is doing work and not processing any messages during this brief period, you can just do

procedure TForm3.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Form4.Show;
  try
    Sleep(2000);
  finally
    Form4.Hide;
  end;
end;

where Form4 is the "please wait" form (which is fsStayOnTop), and Sleep(2000) symbolizes the work done.

Now, the best way to do things is in the background (maybe in a separate thread), or at least you should ProcessMessages once in a while in slow process. If you do the latter, the equivalent of Sleep(2000) will still not return until the process is complete, but you need to write

procedure TForm4.FormCloseQuery(Sender: TObject; var CanClose: Boolean);
begin
  CanClose := false;
end;

in the "please wait" dialog so it cannot be closed (not even with Alt+F4).

If you are using threads or something else more sophisticated, I think that I'll need more details in order to provide an appropriate answer.

share|improve this answer
    
@Mason: I think that should be "sleep"... –  Andreas Rejbrand Sep 23 '10 at 18:27
    
Yeah, no threads. I'm just doing some DB Queries in a place where the user probably expects more instantaneous action. –  Peter Turner Sep 23 '10 at 18:51
    
@Peter: If you do not want to create the form manually in Delphi, seee my new (second) answer. –  Andreas Rejbrand Sep 23 '10 at 18:53
    
yeah I'm going to try your other one. It'll probably get the old green checkmark too. –  Peter Turner Sep 23 '10 at 19:14

I think that's too much to ask. There's no "magic." Having a window come up with specific attributes takes a lot of information to describe those specific attributes, and that has to come from somewhere. Giving it specific behavior means code that has to come from somewhere too. The VCL makes it a lot easier, but you still need to set up the form.

I'd just set up a form of the right size in the Form Designer. Give it a BorderStyle of bsNone, and you get no close box. (But no border either. Or you can make it bsDialog and give it an OnCloseQuery event that always sets CanClose to false.) Give it a TLabel that says "Please Wait," and a TTimer that calls Self.Release after 2 seconds.

Not very Code-Golf-ish, but it'll work and it's simple to set up.

share|improve this answer
    
"A lot?" See my new answer. –  Andreas Rejbrand Sep 23 '10 at 18:51
    
It's both "a lot" of information (as far as the computer is concerned) and "a lot" easier with the VCL (for the average bear, than your second answer)! –  Peter Turner Sep 23 '10 at 19:16

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