Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

i am a new programer in c++

and i have an abstract class A, and i implemented operators in it.

and now i have two classes B and C that extend A.

for some reason the compiler does not identify the operators.

is it because that operators are not inherrited? or is it because that i have a code bug?

here is the code:

#ifndef A_
#define A_

class A{
public:

    friend bool operator==(const A &a1,const A &a2);
}
#endif

inline bool operator==(const A& a1, const A& a2){

....

}

is it not meant to work on B==C and B==B and C==C? thanx

Matt

share|improve this question
1  
What exactly are you asking? Please provide the compiler error messages and more detail. Thanks! – Richard Cook Sep 23 '10 at 18:46
1  
Matt, please provide a minimal, self-contained example which exhibits the problem you're seeing, accompanied by an exact description of what you're expecting ("should compile fine") and what your seeing (exact compiler error messages). – sbi Sep 23 '10 at 18:50
    
This could also depend on the version of the C++ compiler you are using. A very old Borland C++ might get function argument lookup wrong for example. Please tell us the compiler and version you are using. – Zan Lynx Sep 23 '10 at 18:54
    
I prefer not to have base class comparison operators given public accessibility. When an object of type B is passed to a function that operates on objects of type A, there is no easy process for the function to differentiate between an instance of B or C. Very bad design when using generic programming. Many of my early programs failed because of this. – Thomas Matthews Sep 23 '10 at 19:02
1  
Do you have all that in your header file? Having that inline bool operator== outside the include guard looks a bit suspicious. – hrnt Sep 23 '10 at 21:02

The program compiles and runs as expected, correctly calling the right operator when I try it:

class A {
public:
    friend bool operator==(const A &a1, const A &a2);
};

bool operator==(const A &a1, const A &a2) {
    return false;
}

class B : public A {};
class C : public A {};

int main()
{
    B b;
    C c;
    bool equals = b == c;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Put the operator inside the class.

#ifndef A_
#define A_

class A
{
    ...

public:

    bool operator==(const A &other)
    {
        // your operator logic
    }
}
#endif

Optionally, you could make it virtual thus allowing you to override it in the derived classes.

share|improve this answer
    
The friend approach is also valid: see @Reinderien's answer. – Richard Cook Sep 23 '10 at 18:51
    
@Richard - Yes, I didn't say it is not invalid. :) – Venemo Sep 23 '10 at 19:07

My suggestion: don't overload comparison operators in base classes, but implement equivalent protected methods. This will prevent some hard to detect failures in your program.

Example:

class Base
{
  protected:
    bool equal_base(const Base& other) const
    { return member == other.member;}

  private:
    unsigned int member;
};

class B_Child : public Base
{
  public:
    bool operator==(const B_Child& other) const
    { return (member_b == other_member_b) && equal_base(other);}
  private:
    std::string member_b;
};

class C_Child : public Base
{
  public:
    bool operator==(const C_Child& other) const
    { return (member_c == other_member_c) && equal_base(other);}
  private:
    double member_c;
};

Also search the web for "C++ virtual equality operator".

share|improve this answer

How about:

class A
{
    public:
        bool operator==(A const& rhs) const
        {
            return this->isEqual(rhs);
        }
    private:
        virtual bool isEqual(A const& rhS)
        {
            return /* Your test here */
        }
};
class B: public A
{
    private:
        virtual bool isEqual(A const& rhS)
        {
            B& theRealRHS = dynamic_cast<B const&>(rhs);  // Throws if it is not a B
            return /* Your test here */
        }
};
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.