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I'm looking for a way to find common mis-spelling of strings when entered by the keyboard. For example, I would like "house" to return "hoise", "hpuse", "jouse", etc. because the misspelled characters are close to the correct ones on a QWERTY keyboard.

If i could get this to work with numbers only that would still be a big help. Given "101", return "111", "11", "01", "10", etc. It doesn't have to be perfect, just return some common typos.

Does anyone know of an existing method to accomplish this or perhaps a suggestion on how I might write one myself?

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Don't fogret that transopsitions are also frequnetly encoutnered. –  Eric Lippert Sep 23 '10 at 19:06
    
Absolutely true. @Oded's answer incorporates deletion, trasnposition, insertion, and alteration. –  MAW74656 Sep 23 '10 at 19:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The algorithm iteself is not that complicated - you need a good dictionary to compare against.

Read this SO question for more details.

Here is the algorithm itself is 21 lines of python, and here a C# implementation.

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Wow, I guess I'm trying to fight way out of my weight-class here. Can you give a simple call example? Also, I don't see a "dictionary" as you mentioned. –  MAW74656 Sep 23 '10 at 18:57
    
@Marc - look at the source code: File.ReadAllText("big.txt") is where the dictionary ("big.txt") is loaded. The program itself is a command line app, so you can simply run it on the command line. –  Oded Sep 23 '10 at 19:03
    
Ok, I see. I was hoping to integrate the feature into my application, where user can select a job number and program will return possible misstypes for that number (which is actually just a string composed mostly of numbers, but may contain a letter at the end.). –  MAW74656 Sep 23 '10 at 19:06
    
Also, big.txt. Is this simply a giant list of words (like in a dictionary)? Does it need to be in a certain format (Comma separated, tab delimited, etc)? –  MAW74656 Sep 23 '10 at 19:08
    
@MAW74656 - I believe it is one word per line. –  Oded Sep 23 '10 at 19:09

SpellCheck.NET seems to be a good choice.

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/recipes/spellcheckparser.aspx

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The misspelled feature could be helpful. I'll look at it more if there aren't any better recommendations. –  MAW74656 Sep 23 '10 at 18:47

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