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I am looking for networking designs and tricks specific to games. I know about a few problems and I have some partial solutions to some of them but there can be problems I can't see yet. I think there is no definite answer to this but I will accept an answer I really like. I can think of 4 categories of problems.

Bad network

The messages sent by the clients take some time to reach the server. The server can't just process them FCFS because that is unfair against players with higher latency. A partial solution for this would be timestamps on the messages but you need 2 things for that:

  • Be able to trust the clients clock. (I think this is impossible.)
  • Constant latencies you can measure. What can you do about variable latency?

A lot of games use UDP which means messages can be lost. In that case they try to estimate the game state based on the information they already have. How do you know if the estimated state is correct or not after the connection is working again?

In MMO games the server handles a large amount of clients. What is the best way for distributing the load? Based on location in game? Bind a groups of clients to servers? Can you avoid sending everything through the server?

Players leaving

I have seen 2 different behaviours when this happens. In most FPS games if the player who hosted the game (I guess he is the server) leaves the others can't play. In most RTS games if any player leaves the others can continue playing without him. How is it possible without dedicated server? Does everyone know the full state? Are they transfering the role of the server somehow?

Access to information

The next problem can be solved by a dedicated server but I am curious if it can be done without one. In a lot of games the players should not know the full state of the game. Fog-of-war in RTS and walls in FPS are good examples. However, they need to know if an action is valid or not. (Eg. can you shoot me from there or are you on the other side of the map.) In this case clients need to validate changes to an unknown state. This sounds like something that can be solved with clever use of cryptographic primitives. Any ideas?

Cheating

Some of the above problems are easy in a trusted client environment but that can not be assumed. Are there solutions which work for example in a 80% normal user - 20% cheater environment? Can you really make an anti-cheat software that works (and does not require ridiculous things like kernel modules)?

I did read this questions and some of the answers http://stackoverflow.com/questions/901592/best-game-network-programming-articles-and-books but other answers link to unavailable/restricted content. This is a platform/OS independent question but solutions for specific platforms/OSs are welcome as well.

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Great question. –  Paul Nathan Sep 23 '10 at 22:28
2  
Maybe this site is more right fome this question? gamedev.stackexchange.com –  Nakilon Sep 23 '10 at 22:41
    
I didn't realize there was a game specific version of the site. Thank you I will definitely check it out. –  stribika Sep 23 '10 at 23:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Thinking cryptography will solve this kind of problem is a very common and very bad mistake: the client itself of course have to be able to decrypt it, so it is completely pointless. You are not adding security, you're just adding obscurity (and that will be cracked).

Cheating is too game specific. There are some kind of games where it can't be totally eliminated (aimbots in FPS), and some where if you didn't screw up will not be possible at all (server-based turn games).

In general network problems like those are deeply related to prediction which is a very complicated subject at best and is very well explained in the famous Valve article about it.

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I know that simply encrypting the state is not going to work but I have seen some very interesting uses of cryptography. Like checking the result of votes without knowing who voted what or encryption that requires multiple parties to decrypt. Maybe something similar can be used here. These are pretty simple once you seen it but really hard to find out how to do otherwise. –  stribika Sep 23 '10 at 23:02
    
I like the article it has a lot of details about the latency compensation. –  stribika Sep 23 '10 at 23:03

The server can't just process them FCFS because that is unfair against players with higher latency.

Yes it can. Trying to guess exactly how much latency someone has is no more fair as latency varies.

In that case they try to estimate the game state based on the information they already have. How do you know if the estimated state is correct or not after the connection is working again?

The server doesn't have to guess at all - it knows the state. The client only has to guess while the connection is down - when it's back up, it will be sent the new state.

In MMO games the server handles a large amount of clients. What is the best way for distributing the load? Based on location in game?

There's no "best way". Geographical partitioning works fairly well, however.

Can you avoid sending everything through the server?

Only for untrusted communications, which generally are so low on bandwidth that there's no point.

In most RTS games if any player leaves the others can continue playing without him. How is it possible without dedicated server? Does everyone know the full state?

Many RTS games maintain the full state simultaneously across all machines.

Some of the above problems are easy in a trusted client environment but that can not be assumed.

Most games open to the public need to assume a 100% cheater environment.

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Bad network

Players with high latency should buy a new modem. I don't think its a good idea to add even more latency because one person in the game got a bad connection. Or if you mean minor latency differences, who cares? You will only make things slower and complicated if you refuse to FCFS.

Cheating: aimbots and similar

Can you really make an anti-cheat software that works? No, you can not. You can't know if they are running your program or another program that acts like yours.

Cheating: access to information

If you have a secure connection with a dedicated server you can trust, then cheating, like seeing more state than allowed, should be impossible.

There are a few games where cryptography can prevent cheating. Card games like poker, where every player gets a chance to 'shuffle the deck'. Details on wikipedia : Mental Poker.

With a RTS or FPS you could, in theory, encrypt your part of the game state. Then send it to everyone and only send decryption keys for the parts they are allowed to see or when they are allowed to see it. However, I doubt that in 2010 we can do this in real time.

For example, if I want to verify, that you could indeed be at location B. Then I need to know where you came from and when you were there. But if you've told me that before, I knew something I was not allowed to know. If you tell me afterwards, you can tell me anything you want me to believe. You could have told me before, encrypted, and give me the decryption key when I need to verify it. That would mean, you'll have to encrypt every move you make with a different encryption key. Ouch.

If your not implementing a poker site, cheating won't be your biggest problem anyway.

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It's not just about new modems. Physical distance to the server contributes as well, so does the ISP. It's clear that we need some limit on how much latency we are willing to add. A player with a 5 sec RTT won't be able to play no matter what so why ruin the game for the other 5. But (depending on the game) some latency is acceptable. In FPS games the acceptable latency is very low and the tolerance for differences is very low (who shot first matters a lot). In other games the tolerances are higher for both. I think if you can keep the latency acceptable you might as well make it equal. –  stribika Sep 24 '10 at 0:16
    
I think I agree that aimbots are unavoidable. However the ones I saw are certainly detectable they play nothing like a human. Of course it can be adjusted... –  stribika Sep 24 '10 at 0:22
    
+1 for the first intelligent proposal I've read about encription in games, gg! –  Lohoris Sep 24 '10 at 8:43

With a lot of people accessing games on mobile devices, a "bad network" can occur when a player is in an area of poor reception or they're connected to a slow-wifi connection. So it's not just a problem of people connecting in sparsely populated areas. With mobile clients "bad networks" can occur very very often and it's usually EXTREMELY hard to diagnose.

UDP results in packet loss, but even games that use TCP and HTTP based can experience problems where the client & server communication slows to a crawl while packets are verified to have been sent. With communication UDP compensation for packet loss USUALLY depends on what the packets contain. If you're talking about motion data, usually if packets aren't received, the server interpolates the previous trajectory and makes a position change. Usually it's custom to the game how this is handled, which is why people often avoid UDP unless their game type requires it. Often to handle high network latency, problems games will automatically degrade the amount of features available to the users so that they can still interact with the game without causing the user to get kicked or experience too many broken features.

Optimally you want to have a logging tool like Loggly available that can help you find errors related to bad connection and latency and show you the conditions on the clients and server at the time they happened, this visibility lets you diagnose common problems users experience and develop strategies to address them.

Players leaving Most games these days have dedicated servers, so this issue is mostly moot. However, sometimes yes, the server can be changed to another client.

Cheating It's extremely hard to anticipate how players will cheat and create a cheat-proof system no one can hack. These days, a lot of cheat detection strategies are based on heuristic analysis of logging and behavioral analytics information data to spot abnormalities when they happen and flag it for review. You definitely should try to cheat-proof as much as is reasonable, but you also really need an early detection system that can spot new flaws people are exploiting.

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