Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm seeing strange behavior with the MAX macro in Objective C. Specifically, I have this code in my main function:

NSArray* array = [NSArray array];
NSLog(@"[array count] - 1 = %d", [array count] - 1);
NSLog(@"MAX(0, [array count] - 1) = %d", MAX(0, [array count] - 1));
NSLog(@"MAX(0, -1) = %d", MAX(0, -1));

The output is:

[array count] - 1 = -1
MAX(0, [array count] - 1) = -1
MAX(0, -1) = 0

I saved the preprocessor output with -save-temps, and it looks like this:

NSArray* array = [NSArray array];
NSLog(@"[array count] - 1 = %d", [array count] - 1);
NSLog(@"MAX(0, [array count] - 1) = %d", ((0) > ([array count] - 1) ? (0) : ([array count] - 1)));
NSLog(@"MAX(0, -1) = %d", ((0) > (-1) ? (0) : (-1)));

All the necessary parentheses are there, and [array count] - 1 has no side effects, so the usual macro issues shouldn't apply. Any idea what's going on?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 20 down vote accepted

[array count] returns a NSUInteger -- in other words, an unsigned integer. So [array count] - 1 is not -1, it is ((NSUInteger)-1), which is 0xFFFFFFFF or something like that -- which is greater than zero.

But then when you take 0xFFFFFFFF and pass it as an argument to NSLog(@"%d"), NSLog treats it as a signed integer (because you used %d).

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't notice that the return value was unsigned, but it makes sense. Thanks! –  Adam Crume Sep 24 '10 at 1:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.