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Imagine the following solution:

  • Website ABC.com (not Web Application)
  • BLL (business logic layer in a seperate assembly)
  • DTO (dto objects in their own assembly)
  • DAL (data access layer in it's own assembly as well).

    1. The BLL has a reference to the DAL.
    2. The BLL has a reference to the DTO layer.
    3. The Website project references the BLL.

When one compiles the website project, the following DLLs will appear in the BIN directory:
BLL.dll
DTO.dll
DAL.dll

When one goes to preview the site, an error occurs about not having the necessary assembly references... Now if one right clicks on the website project, Add Reference, and explicitly add the reference to the missing assemblies, it will work fine.

It seems to me like ASP.NET pulls the referenced assemblies of the referenced assembly being added/referenced in the website.

Why does one need to add explicit references to the references of the references... ? Sorry if I'm not wording this correctly or if it confusing.

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3 Answers 3

Here is a good article on your question Compilation and Deployment.

It has something to do with "WebSites" being compile at runtime. Hopefully the above article will answer your question.

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I think the problem may have to do with using a web site project, as oppossed to a Web Application. I can't remember off the top of my head, but there's something funky about the way web site projects are compiled, as oppossed to web application projects.

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2  
Web site projects are not compiled - not until runtime, that is. They're very strange and should be avoided due to that strangeness. –  John Saunders Jul 15 '13 at 21:39
    
@JohnSaunders They are strange, and I hate and avoid them, but here at work they have one big advantage. Our system has been modified here and there for various clients, and sometimes we need a client to send us their web site, with source code. If the web site had been compiled, it would be a very long and sticky ride decompiling the DLL's. I know this from experience. –  ProfK Aug 1 '13 at 11:52
1  
Zip files of the code also work –  John Saunders Aug 1 '13 at 14:28

Just tested this scenario today for the project I'm on. You should be just fine just adding your assembly in Web.config as:

<compilation debug="true">
  <assemblies>
    <clear/>
    <add assembly="mscorlib"/>
    <add assembly="System, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089"/>
    <add assembly="System.Configuration, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a"/>
    <add assembly="System.Web, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a"/>
    <add assembly="System.Data, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089"/>

    <add assembly="YourBLLLib, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null"/>
  </assemblies>
</compilation>

Also your assemblies should stay in the famous ./bin folder of your web site's root. GL!

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