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I have the following HTML:

<html>
  <head><title>Title</title></head>
  <body>
    <div id='div2'>
      <a href='#'>1</a>
      <div id='div1'>
        <a href='#'>2</a>
      </div> 
    </div>

  </body>
</html>

... and the following Javascript code, which I'm running through Greasemonkey:

var nodes = document.body.getElementsByTagName('a');
for (var i = 0; i < nodes.length; i++) {
  var node = nodes[i];
  node.parentNode.removeChild(node);    
}

I would expect it to find and remove all A tags; instead it finds the first, but not the second. As far as I can tell it's having difficulty with the way the second A tag is nested.

Could someone please let me know how to remove all the tags, using getElementsByTagName? There are reasons I'd prefer not to use XPath if at all possible.

share|improve this question
    
It'll probably require recursion. – Matchu Sep 24 '10 at 2:39
    
The documentation I was reading says: "The getElementsByTagName method searches recursively through all descendant nodes of the current node searching for node elements with the specified name." So I was expecting it to do the recursion for me, which leads me to suspect I'm making a simple mistake. – Duncan Bayne Sep 24 '10 at 2:52
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Capture the length and remove in reverse order. This will eliminate side effects.

var nodes = document.body.getElementsByTagName('a');

for (var J=nodes.length-1;  J >= 0;  J--) //-- Kill the last, first, to avoid orphan problems.
{
    var node    = nodes[J];
    if (node)
    {
        node.parentNode.removeChild (node);
    }
}

But a better way...
Add this directive to your header:

// @require http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.3.2/jquery.min.js

Then your whole code becomes:

$("a").remove ();
share|improve this answer

Following Vinay's answer:

var nodes = document.body.getElementsByTagName('a');
while(nodes.length > 0) {
  nodes[0].parentNode.removeChild(nodes[0]);
}

Since using a for loop like that is bizarre if you aren't actually using the iterator for anything.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually I am using it in my code; the snippet I pasted was the smallest subset of my code that reproduced the problem. – Duncan Bayne Sep 24 '10 at 3:02

The mistake you had was to delete the node then skip to the next element. Deleting the very first one (#0) causes the second become the 1st.

var nodes = document.body.getElementsByTagName('a');
for (var i = 0; i < nodes.length; i++) {
  var node = nodes[0]; // fixed 0 here, as opposed to i
  node.parentNode.removeChild(node);    
}
share|improve this answer

change your code to

var nodes = document.body.getElementsByTagName('a');
for (var i = 0; nodes.length > 0; i++) {
    var node = nodes[0];
    node.parentNode.removeChild(node);    
}

nodes.length gets evaluated everytime you remove a child.

share|improve this answer
    
Even if nodes.length does get evaluated every time, why does node.parentNode.removeChild(node) actually remove it from the array, as opposed to just from the DOM node? – Jamie Wong Sep 24 '10 at 3:00
    
@Wong try debugging the original script, you will understand what i mean by reevaluated. as to y it happens you can look into any article on javascript best practices for an explaination. – Vinay B R Sep 24 '10 at 5:01

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