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>> current_user.first_visit
=> 0
>> if current_user.first_visit
>> puts "test"
>> end
test
=> nil

Why does it print test?

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It looks like your question has been answered. But you should stop using numeric values for true/false. Use the keywords true and false if your language supports them –  colithium Sep 24 '10 at 4:02
    
Rails has extended the integer type. You can also use "if current_user.first_visit.zero?" –  vise Sep 24 '10 at 5:49
1  
@vise: .zero? is plain old ruby: APIdock.com link –  Andrew Grimm Sep 24 '10 at 10:27
    
This question is probably a duplicate of What are the Ruby Gotchas a newbie should be warned about? –  Andrew Grimm Sep 24 '10 at 10:28
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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

In Ruby only nil and false can be count as false. That's why in different cases you must use == 0, .blank?, .empty?, etc.

By the way, you may place nil instead of false only when it's used as logical value. But in other cases they have different behavior.

irb(main):053:0> "asd#{false}asd"
=> "asdfalseasd"
irb(main):054:0> "asd#{nil}asd"
=> "asdasd"

Because they are different Ruby classes.

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1  
Please note that .blank? , .empty? are extensions provided by Rails framework (through activesupport) and not available in Ruby Standard or Core Lib. Also the different behaviour is because "#{false}" calls the to_s method. –  Swanand Sep 24 '10 at 5:49
2  
@swanand: zero? and empty? are there in core lib (not sure which classes you had in mind, though). –  Mladen Jablanović Sep 24 '10 at 9:17
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You can think of Ruby's if as testing either a boolean, or for the availability of data (vs nil). The implicit conversion from 0 to false supported by C and (hence other languages like C++) was more an historical artefact from days before C had a distinct boolean type. There, it relies on 0 being a convenient sentinel value or having an intuitive meaning. For many things (e.g. some country where clothing sizes range from 0 to 8, POSIX libC function call results) zero does not convert nicely to a logically equivalent boolean, so it's not a bad thing that Ruby goes its own way.

From this perspective, the issue with your code is that current_user.first_visit - the name of which implies a boolean type - actually holds 0 and not false. Alternatively, if you had the clearly numeric current_user.visit_counter, it would be natural and correct to use one of:

current_user.visit_counter > 0
current_user.visit_counter >= 1
current_user.visit_counter != 0
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You can try this

>> current_user.first_visit
=> 0
>> if current_user.first_visit != 0
>> puts "test"
>> else
>> puts "fail"
>> end
fail
=>nil

When checking for numeric values you also need to match it with the expected value

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