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I have a string User name (sales) and I want to extract the text between the brackets, how would I do this?

I suspect sub-string but I can't work out how to read until the closing bracket, the length of text will vary.

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1  
Show us what you've tried. Have you looked at using regular expressions? –  George Stocker Dec 18 '08 at 16:37

15 Answers 15

This code is faster than most solutions here (if not all), packed as String extension method, it does not support recursive nesting:

public static string GetNestedString(this string str, char start, char end)
{
    int s = -1;
    int i = -1;
    while (++i < str.Length)
        if (str[i] == start)
        {
            s = i;
            break;
        }
    int e = -1;
    while(++i < str.Length)
        if (str[i] == end)
        {
            e = i;
            break;
        }
    if (e > s)
        return str.Substring(s + 1, e - s - 1);
    return null;
}

This one is little longer and slower, but it handles recursive nesting more nicely:

public static string GetNestedString(this string str, char start, char end)
{
    int s = -1;
    int i = -1;
    while (++i < str.Length)
        if (str[i] == start)
        {
            s = i;
            break;
        }
    int e = -1;
    int depth = 0;
    while (++i < str.Length)
        if (str[i] == end)
        {
            e = i;
            if (depth == 0)
                break;
            else
                --depth;
        }
        else if (str[i] == start)
            ++depth;
    if (e > s)
        return str.Substring(s + 1, e - s - 1);
    return null;
}
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I'm finding that regular expressions are extremely useful but very difficult to write. So, I did some research and found this tool that makes writing them so easy.

Don't shy away from them because the syntax is difficult to figure out. They can be so powerful.

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Welcome to SO! This is good advice, but it shouldn't have been posted as an answer. General advice like this should be posted as comments, if at all. An answer must address the asker's specific problem. I know you don't have enough reputation points to post comments yet, but this is exactly why the rep threshold exists. When you've been around a little longer you'll see that people are always recommending tools like Rubular (in comments, of course). In other words, this advice may be useful, but it's not urgent. –  Alan Moore Feb 18 at 15:11

I came across this while I was looking for a solution to a very similar implementation.

Here is a snippet from my actual code. Starts substring from the first char (index 0).

 string separator = "\n";     //line terminator

 string output;
 string input= "HowAreYou?\nLets go there!";

 output = input.Substring(0, input.IndexOf(separator)); 
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Here is a general purpose readable function that avoids using regex:

// Returns the text between 'start' and 'end'.
string ExtractBetween(string text, string start, string end)
{
  int iStart = text.IndexOf(start);
  iStart = (iStart == -1) ? 0 : iStart + start.Length;
  int iEnd = text.LastIndexOf(end);
  if(iEnd == -1)
  {
    iEnd = text.Length;
  }
  int len = iEnd - iStart;

  return text.Substring(iStart, len);
}

To call it in your particular example you can do:

string result = ExtractBetween("User name (sales)", "(", ")");
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Assuming that you only have one pair of parenthesis.

string s = "User name (sales)";
int start = s.IndexOf("(") + 1;
int end = s.IndexOf(")", start);
string result = s.Substring(start, end - start);
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7  
start+1 in the substring is more correct if you want "sales" instead of (sales) –  Joze Oct 19 '11 at 11:24
1  
what will happend s= "User ) name (Sales)"? –  dotnetstep Nov 15 '13 at 9:54
    
@dotnetstep you're right should be int end = s.IndexOf(")", start);. I've queued an edit... –  ChrisD Feb 21 '14 at 20:36
    
"(".Length; is better than +1. Sent a edit. Also added a function. –  ardaozkal Nov 30 '14 at 22:39
using System;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

private IEnumerable<string> GetSubStrings(string input, string start, string end)
{
    Regex r = new Regex(Regex.Escape(start) +`"(.*?)"`  + Regex.Escape(end));
    MatchCollection matches = r.Matches(input);
    foreach (Match match in matches)
    yield return match.Groups[1].Value;
}
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A very simple way to do it is by using regular expressions:

Regex.Match("User name (sales)", @"\(([^)]*)\)").Groups[1].Value

As a response to the (very funny) comment, here's the same Regex with some explanation:

\(             # Escaped parenthesis, means "starts with a '(' character"
    (          # Parentheses in a regex mean "put (capture) the stuff 
               #     in between into the Groups array" 
       [^)]    # Any character that is not a ')' character
       *       # Zero or more occurrences of the aforementioned "non ')' char"
    )          # Close the capturing group
\)             # "Ends with a ')' character"
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246  
I love it when people say "a simple way is to use regular expressions" and then offer what amounts to a string of indecipherable hieroglyphics (it's especially fun when different people suggest regex and each comes up with a different set of hieroglyphics for the same problem). :) –  Deltics Mar 26 '10 at 3:14
10  
There aren't nearly enough answers on stack that actually explain what's going on. Thank you for the wonderful explanation. –  Sandy Gifford Oct 14 '13 at 21:02
    
If You are using '@' at the begining I think You don't need to escape parenthesis? –  rank1 Nov 27 '13 at 17:12
5  
@rank1 you must escape the parenthesis. What @ offers here is that you don't need to escape the backslashes. So without the @ it would be like "\\(([^)]*)\\)". –  Diadistis Nov 28 '13 at 11:10
    
Sorry I could not resist but to leave this unconstructive comment here: But this my friend is one of the if not THE best awnser I have seen around here. –  bodycountPP Dec 3 '14 at 13:36

If you wish to stay away from regular expressions, the simplest way I can think of is:

string input = "User name (sales)";
string output = input.Split(new char[] { '(', ')' })[1];
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19  
Honestly, this should've been selected as the answer. –  Pat Lindley Jan 11 '13 at 18:58
    
Isn't it be further contracted into input.Split("()".ToCharArray())[1] –  prabhakaran May 12 '14 at 9:55

Use this function:

public string GetSubstringByString(string a, string b, string c)
    {
        return c.Substring((c.IndexOf(a) + a.Length), (c.IndexOf(b) - c.IndexOf(a) - a.Length));
    }

and here is the usage:

GetSubstringByString("(", ")", "User name (sales)")

and the output would be:

sales
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The regex method is superior I think, but if you wanted to use the humble substring

string input= "my name is (Jayne C)";
int start = input.IndexOf("(");
int stop = input.IndexOf(")");
string output = input.Substring(start+1, stop - start - 1);

or

string input = "my name is (Jayne C)";
string output  = input.Substring(input.IndexOf("(") +1, input.IndexOf(")")- input.IndexOf("(")- 1);
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input.Remove(input.IndexOf(')')).Substring(input.IndexOf('(') + 1);
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Use a Regular Expression:

string test = "(test)"; 
string word = Regex.Match(test, @"\((\w+)\)").Groups[1].Value;
Console.WriteLine(word);
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string input = "User name (sales)";

string output = input.Substring(input.IndexOf('(') + 1, input.IndexOf(')') - input.IndexOf('(') - 1);
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1  
You should of course only calculate the location of the first bracket once. –  Martin Brown Dec 18 '08 at 19:29
    
In the case where you have inner parenthesis e.g. input = "User name (sales(1)) you may want to use input.LastIndexOf(')') which will work if there are inner parenthesis or not. –  Ben Jan 5 at 10:30

Regular expressions might be the best tool here. If you are not famililar with them, I recommend you install Expresso - a great little regex tool.

Something like:

		Regex regex = new Regex("\\((?<TextInsideBrackets>\\w+)\\)");
		string incomingValue = "Username (sales)";
		string insideBrackets = null;
		Match match = regex.Match(incomingValue);
		if(match.Success)
		{
			insideBrackets = match.Groups["TextInsideBrackets"].Value;
		}
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A regex maybe? I think this would work...

\(([a-z]+?)\)
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protected by Richard Jan 28 '13 at 9:48

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