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Let's say I have this:

$array = array("john" => "doe", "foe" => "bar", "oh" => "yeah");

foreach($array as $i=>$k)
{
echo $i.'-'.$k.',';
}

echoes "john-doe,foe-bar,oh-yeah,"

How do I get rid of the last comma?

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8 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Alternatively you can use the rtrim function as:

$result = '';
foreach($array as $i=>$k) {
    $result .= $i.'-'.$k.',';
}
$result = rtrim($result,',');
echo $result;
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3  
Yea, forgot about the trimming. +1 –  Brad F Jacobs Sep 24 '10 at 5:06
    
I like this one better, thanks. –  Bastien Sep 24 '10 at 5:16
    
too bad php doesn't support unset($result[strlen($result)-1]). It would be so nice... –  NikiC Sep 24 '10 at 6:44
    
@NullUserException: Hum, but you can do string[0] = 'a'. So you can change them. Only unsetting string offsets isn't possible. This doesn't make sense to me, because strings support all array operations (offsetGet, offsetSet, offsetExists) apart from unset (offsetUnset). –  NikiC Sep 25 '10 at 12:15
    
@niki I wouldn't call unsetting an arbitrary offset an array operation. If it's the last one, yeah; but by the principle of least astonishment you wouldn't want it to support unsetting the last element but not the other ones. –  NullUserException Sep 25 '10 at 13:00
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One method is by using substr

$array = array("john" => "doe", "foe" => "bar", "oh" => "yeah");

$output = "";
foreach($array as $i=>$k)
{
    $output .= $i.'-'.$k.',';
}

$output = substr($output, 0, -1);

echo $output;

Another method would be using implode

$array = array("john" => "doe", "foe" => "bar", "oh" => "yeah");

$output = array();
foreach($array as $i=>$k)
{
    $output[] = $i.'-'.$k;
}

echo implode(',', $output);
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thank you for your help –  Bastien Sep 24 '10 at 5:11
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try this code after foreach condition then echo $result1

$result1=substr($i, 0, -1);
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I don't like this idea of using substr at all, since it's the style of bad programming. The idea is to concatenate all elements and to separate them by special "separating" phrases. The idea to call the substring for that is like to use a laser to shoot the birds.

In the project I am currently dealing with, we try to get rid of bad habits in coding. And this sample is considered one of them. We force programmers to write this code like this:

$first = true;
$result = "";
foreach ($array as $i => $k) {
  if (!$first) $result .= ",";
  $first = false;
  $result .= $i.'-'.$k;
}
echo $result;

The purpose of this code is much clearer, than the one that uses substr. Or you can simply use implode function (our project is in Java, so we had to design our own function for concatenating strings that way). You should use substr function only when you have a real need for that. Here this should be avoided, since it's a sign of bad programming style.

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How is it a sign of bad programming style? Would you mind elaborating on that for all of us? As far as I can see it does not hinder the performance. I can understand the clarity part, but at the same time it is not hard to read up on what substr does to figure it out. Thanks! –  Brad F Jacobs Sep 24 '10 at 13:25
    
IMHO, every tool should be used appropriately in programs, and it is NOT substr purpose to serve for string concatenation, it was designed for other issues. Besides, this code with substr looks clear only then it's in one place. If there many fragments like this, the code turns into unreadable. Therefore in our project we changed to normal concatenation, and also made a special function for that. Now the part of project that's dealing with strings is much more readable. –  SPIRiT_1984 Sep 25 '10 at 13:51
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I always use this method:

$result = '';
foreach($array as $i=>$k) {
    if(strlen($result) > 0) {
        $result .= ","
    }
    $result .= $i.'-'.$k;
}
echo $result;
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Bad idea to use strlen for this. See Joel Spolsky "Back to basics" article in order to see why. Just use a boolean flag in order to perform such check, because in worst case (array has N elements - single characters) you will end up with O(N^2) complexity. –  SPIRiT_1984 Sep 24 '10 at 6:15
    
In general, don't use string functions in order to achieve some effect, that can be easily achieved by simple programming tricks (the same is true for using substr in order to get rid of last comma - it's better not to generate the last comman at all). –  SPIRiT_1984 Sep 24 '10 at 6:17
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I dislike all previous recipes.

Php is not C and has higher-level ways to deal with this particular problem.

I will begin from the point where you have an array like this:

$array = array('john-doe', 'foe-bar', 'oh-yeah');

You can build such an array from the initial one using a loop or array_map() function. Note that I'm using single-quoted strings. This is a micro-optimization if you don't have variable names that need to be substituted.

Now you need to generate a CSV string from this array, it can be done like this:

echo implode(',', $array);
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This approach's benifit that we can change the delimiter easier. Moreover, you can explode the string to array later similar to this.Not sure about performance drawback –  thethanghn Sep 24 '10 at 6:36
    
+1 for the cleaner approach. –  NikiC Sep 24 '10 at 6:43
    
I like this one better too. Don't loop if you don't have to. –  Powertieke Sep 24 '10 at 6:44
    
+1, so much better than the rest.. –  st0le Sep 24 '10 at 6:45
    
Apparently you didn't even read all previous recipes, cause this was already suggested by premiso. –  Mischa Sep 24 '10 at 6:47
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this would do:

rtrim ($string, ',')
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Assuming the array is an index, this is working for me. I loop $i and test $i against the $key. When the key ends, the commas do not print. Notice the IF has two values to make sure the first value does not have a comma at the very beginning.

foreach($array as $key => $value)
{
    $w = $key;
    //echo "<br>w: ".$w."<br>";// test text
    //echo "x: ".$x."<br>";// test text
    if($w == $x && $w != 0 )
    {
    echo ", ";
    }
    echo $value;
    $x++;
}
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