Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What approach do you recommend for persisting user settings in a WPF windows (desktop) application? Note that the idea is that the user can change their settings at run time, and then can close down the application, then when starting up the application later the application will use the current settings. Effectively then it will appear as if the application settings do not change.

Q1 - Database or other approach? I do have a sqlite database that I will be using anyway hence using a table in the database would be as good as any approach?

Q2 - If Database: What database table design? One table with columns for different data types that one might have (e.g. string, long, DateTime etc) OR just a table with a string for the value upon which you have to serialize and de-serialize the values? I'm thinking the first would be easier, and if there aren't many settings the overhead isn't much?

Q3 - Could Application Settings be used for this? If so are there any special tasks required to enable the persistence here? Also what would happen re usage of the "default" value in the Application Settings designer in this case? Would the default override any settings that were saved between running the application? (or would you need to NOT use the default value)

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You can use project settings for this, using database is not the best option considering the time consumed to read and write the settings(specially if you use web services).

Here are few links which explains how to achieve this -

User Settings in WPF

Quick WPF Tip: How to bind to WPF application resources and settings?

A Configurable Window for WPF

share|improve this answer
1  
Here's another good link. stackoverflow.com/a/396243/878612 –  lko Sep 23 '13 at 20:46

You can store your settings info as Strings of XML in the Settings.Default. Create some classes to store your configuration data and make sure they are [Serializable]. Then, with the following helpers, you can serialize instances of these objects--or List<T> (or arrays T[], etc.) of them--to String. Store each of these various strings in its own respective Settings.Default slot in your WPF application's Settings.

To recover the objects the next time the app starts, read the Settings string of interest and Deserialize to the expected type T (which this time must be explcitly specified as a type argument to Deserialize<T>).

public static String Serialize<T>(T t)
{
    using (StringWriter sw = new StringWriter())
    using (XmlWriter xw = XmlWriter.Create(sw))
    {
        new XmlSerializer(typeof(T)).Serialize(xw, t);
        return sw.GetStringBuilder().ToString();
    }
}

public static T Deserialize<T>(String s_xml)
{
    using (XmlReader xw = XmlReader.Create(new StringReader(s_xml)))
        return (T)new XmlSerializer(typeof(T)).Deserialize(xw);
}
share|improve this answer

The long running most typical approach to this question is: Isolated Storage.

Serialize your control state to XML or some other format (especially easily if you're saving Dependency Properties with WPF), then save the file to the user's isolated storage.

If you do want to go the app setting route, I tried something similar at one point myself...though the below approach could easily be adapted to use Isolated Storage:

class SettingsManager
{
    public static void LoadSettings(FrameworkElement sender, Dictionary<FrameworkElement, DependencyProperty> savedElements)
    {
        EnsureProperties(sender, savedElements);
        foreach (FrameworkElement element in savedElements.Keys)
        {
            try
            {
                element.SetValue(savedElements[element], Properties.Settings.Default[sender.Name + "." + element.Name]);
            }
            catch (Exception ex) { }
        }
    }

    public static void SaveSettings(FrameworkElement sender, Dictionary<FrameworkElement, DependencyProperty> savedElements)
    {
        EnsureProperties(sender, savedElements);
        foreach (FrameworkElement element in savedElements.Keys)
        {
            Properties.Settings.Default[sender.Name + "." + element.Name] = element.GetValue(savedElements[element]);
        }
        Properties.Settings.Default.Save();
    }

    public static void EnsureProperties(FrameworkElement sender, Dictionary<FrameworkElement, DependencyProperty> savedElements)
    {
        foreach (FrameworkElement element in savedElements.Keys)
        {
            bool hasProperty =
                Properties.Settings.Default.Properties[sender.Name + "." + element.Name] != null;

            if (!hasProperty)
            {
                SettingsAttributeDictionary attributes = new SettingsAttributeDictionary();
                UserScopedSettingAttribute attribute = new UserScopedSettingAttribute();
                attributes.Add(attribute.GetType(), attribute);

                SettingsProperty property = new SettingsProperty(sender.Name + "." + element.Name,
                    savedElements[element].DefaultMetadata.DefaultValue.GetType(), Properties.Settings.Default.Providers["LocalFileSettingsProvider"], false, null, SettingsSerializeAs.String, attributes, true, true);
                Properties.Settings.Default.Properties.Add(property);
            }
        }
        Properties.Settings.Default.Reload();
    }
}

.....and....

  Dictionary<FrameworkElement, DependencyProperty> savedElements = new Dictionary<FrameworkElement, DependencyProperty>();

public Window_Load(object sender, EventArgs e) {
           savedElements.Add(firstNameText, TextBox.TextProperty);
                savedElements.Add(lastNameText, TextBox.TextProperty);

            SettingsManager.LoadSettings(this, savedElements);
}

private void Window_Closing(object sender, System.ComponentModel.CancelEventArgs e)
        {
            SettingsManager.SaveSettings(this, savedElements);
        }
share|improve this answer

Apart from a database, you can also have following options to save user related settings

  1. registry under HKEY_CURRENT_USER

  2. in a file in AppData folder

  3. using Settings file in WPF and by setting its scope as User

share|improve this answer

In my experience storing all the settings in a database table is the best solution. Don't even worry about performance. Today's databases are fast and can easily store thousands columns in a table. I learned this the hard way - before I was serilizing/deserializing - nightmare. Storing it in local file or registry has one big problem - if you have to support your app and computer is off - user is not in front of it - there is nothing you can do.... if setings are in DB - you can changed them and viola not to mention that you can compare the settings....

share|improve this answer

I typically do this sort of thing by defining a custom [Serializable] settings class and simply serializing it to disk. In your case case you could just as easily store it as a string blog in your SQLite database.

share|improve this answer

I also prefer to go with serialization to file. XML files fits mostly all requirements. You can use the ApplicationSettings build in but thoose have some restrictions and a defined but (for me) very strange behaviour where they stored. I used them alot and they work. But if you want to have full control how and where they stored I use another approach.

  1. Make a class Somewhere with all your settings. I named it MySettings
  2. Implement Save and Read for persistence
  3. Use them in you application-code

Advantages:

  • Very Simple approach.
  • One Class for Settings. Load. Save.
  • All your Settings are type safe.
  • You can simplify or extened the logic to your needs (Versioning, many Profiles per User, etc.)
  • It works very well in any case (Database, WinForms, WPF, Service, etc...)
  • You can define where to store the XML files.
  • You can find them and manipulate them either by code or manual
  • It works for any deployment method I can imagine.

Disadvantages: - You have to think about where to store your settings files. (But you can just use your installation folder)

Here is a simple example (not tested).


public class MySettings
        {
            public string Setting1 { get; set; }
            public List Setting2 { get; set; }

            public void Save(string filename)
            {
                using (StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(filename))
                {
                    XmlSerializer xmls = new XmlSerializer(typeof(MySettings));
                    xmls.Serialize(sw, this);
                }
            }
            public MySettings Read(string filename)
            {
                using (StreamReader sw = new StreamReader(filename))
                {
                    XmlSerializer xmls = new XmlSerializer(typeof(MySettings));
                    return xmls.Deserialize(sw) as MySettings;
                }
            }
        }

And here is how to use it. It's possible to load default values or override them with the user's settings by just checking if user settings exist:


        public class MyApplicationLogic
        {

            public const string UserSettingsFilename = "settings.xml";
            public string _DefaultSettingspath = Assembly.GetEntryAssembly().Location + "\\Settings\\" + UserSettingsFilename;
            public string _UserSettingsPath = Assembly.GetEntryAssembly().Location + "\\Settings\\UserSettings\\" + UserSettingsFilename;

            public MyApplicationLogic()
            {
                // if default settings exist
                if(File.Exists(_UserSettingsPath))
                    this.Settings = Settings.Read(_UserSettingsPath);
                else
                    this.Settings = Settings.Read(_DefaultSettingspath);
            }
            public MySettings Settings { get; private set; }

            public void SaveUserSettings()
            {
                Settings.Save(_UserSettingsPath);
            }

        }

maybe someone get's inspired by this approach. This is how I do it now for many years and I'm quite happy with that.

share|improve this answer
  1. In all the places I've worked, database has been mandatory because of application support. As Adam said, the user might not be at his desk or the machine might be off, or you might want to quickly change someone's configuration or assign a new-joiner a default (or team member's) config.

  2. If the settings are likely to grow as new versions of the application are released, you might want to store the data as blobs which can then be deserialized by the application. This is especially useful if you use something like Prism which discovers modules, as you can't know what settings a module will return. The blobs could be keyed by username/machine composite key. That way you can have different settings for every machine.

  3. I've not used the in-built Settings class much so I'll abstain from commenting. :)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.