Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create a Regex usuable in C# that will allow me to take a list of single letters and/or letter groups and ensure that a word is only comprised of items from that list. For instance:

  • 'a' would match 'a', 'aa', 'aaa', but not 'ab'
  • 'a b' would match 'a', 'ab', 'abba', 'b', but not 'abc'
  • 'a b abc' would match 'a', 'ab', 'abc', 'aabc', 'baabc', but not 'ababac'

I thought something of the form

(a|b|abc)*

would work, but it incorrectly matches the last term. Here's the code I'm testing with:

[Fact]
public void TestRegex()
{
    Regex regex = new Regex("(a|b|abc)*");
    regex.IsMatch("a").ShouldBeTrue();
    regex.IsMatch("b").ShouldBeTrue();
    regex.IsMatch("abc").ShouldBeTrue();
    regex.IsMatch("aabc").ShouldBeTrue();
    regex.IsMatch("baabc").ShouldBeTrue();

    // This should not match ... I don't think anyway
    regex.IsMatch("ababac").ShouldBeFalse();
}

I have a pretty basic understanding of regex, so apologies if I'm missing something obvious here :)

Update I don't understand why your counter-example is a counter-example : ababac = a b a bac. cCould you clarify ?

I only want to use 'a', 'b', and 'abc' - 'bac' would be a completely different term.

Let me give another example: Using 'ba' and 't', I could match the word 'bat', but not 'tab'. The order of the letters inside the letter groups is important.

(Tests with Diadistis' solution)

    [Fact]
    public void TestRegex()
    {
        Regex regex = new Regex(@"\A(?:(e|l|ho)*)\Z");
        regex.IsMatch("e").ShouldBeTrue();
        regex.IsMatch("l").ShouldBeTrue();
        regex.IsMatch("ho").ShouldBeTrue();
        regex.IsMatch("elho").ShouldBeTrue();
        regex.IsMatch("hole").ShouldBeTrue();
        regex.IsMatch("holle").ShouldBeTrue();
        regex.IsMatch("hello").ShouldBeFalse();
        regex.IsMatch("hotel").ShouldBeFalse();
    }
share|improve this question
    
I don't understand why your counter-example is a counter-example : ababac = a b a bac. cCould you clarify ? –  Nicolas Dec 18 '08 at 17:22
    
I agree. Can you clarify? –  David Norman Dec 18 '08 at 17:48
    
You're not doing enough testing. –  Brad Gilbert Dec 18 '08 at 17:49
    
Brad: I'd like to understand why the current tests don't work before I proceed with more tests. If you have some examples that would be quite helpeful. –  Jedidja Dec 18 '08 at 18:12
    
Should "holle" match? –  Martin Brown Dec 18 '08 at 19:38
show 1 more comment

2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I am not quite sure what are you trying to do but in order for the last one to be false you should check if the string can be matched entirely :

Regex regex = new Regex(@"\A(?:(a|b|abc)*)\Z");
share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to take a list of single letters and/or groups of letters and identify whether a word is comprised solely of those terms. If my list of terms is (e, l, ho) then 'hole' would be a valid match, but 'hello' and 'hotel' would not. –  Jedidja Dec 18 '08 at 18:14
    
I don't think there's any value in capturing the individual chunks, if there's no value in capturing the whole thing \A(?:a|b|abc)*\Z works just as well. –  Axeman Dec 18 '08 at 22:35
add comment

Try bracketing your regex with ^ and $ to ensure that exactly the whole line is considered:

^(a|b|abc)*$
share|improve this answer
    
This one is more useful for those who don't use C# regexps. –  Arkadiy Dec 18 '08 at 18:29
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.