Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have written a programme like helloworld, is there any way i can commit project like it to a CVS server? It seems the project approved must meet some requirements, so i think the chance is tiny. Is there existing CVS server which allow beginners to host their "simple" project free.

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Why do you want to use CVS? –  Skilldrick Sep 24 '10 at 8:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If your aim is to get used to source control systems, then just use your own PC as a local CVS server. It's not hard.

Also, CVS is outdated and has problems. I recommend SVN instead. Here's a guide to setting up SVN locally on Windows.

share|improve this answer
    
If you are hosting the repository on the local machine I really (x5) recommend using Mercurial (eg.). –  mbanzon Sep 24 '10 at 13:06
    
@mbanzon: Why, what's special about Mercurial? –  Stefan Monov Sep 24 '10 at 15:38
    
the guide is for windows but i am using linux. Anyway thank you . Now i want to try mercurial, can it be integrated with eclipse ? –  Tracy Sep 24 '10 at 17:36
    
In my personal work I prefer Mercurial because it gives me the posibility to clone and branch projects very easilly across multiply machines or on a single machine as I like. –  mbanzon Sep 25 '10 at 14:45

You can host your own CVS server - which would make it free.

But now you are at it - why CVS? Personally I switched to Subversion a long time ago and then recently switched to Mercurial. imho any distributed version control system would do.

Is CVS some sort of requirement or just what you stumbled uppon first?

share|improve this answer
    
i meant that the approved project must abide by the requirements of the CVS server,which is sometimes not feasible for beginners. –  Tracy Sep 24 '10 at 17:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.