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I'm using automation to test an application, but sometimes I want to start the application via a batch file. When I run "process.WaitForInputIdle(100)" I get an error:

"WaitForInputIdle failed. This could be because the process does not have a graphical interface."

How can I tell if the process has a graphical interface or not?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

See Environment.UserInteractive. That will identify whether the process has an interface at all, e.g. services are not user interactive.

You could also look at Process.MainWindowHandle which will tell you whether there is a graphical interface.

A combination of these two checks should cover all the possibilities.

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Unfortunately batch files appear to be user interactive (this returns "true" for both the batch file and the window). –  Lunivore Sep 24 '10 at 9:34
    
When you say the Process.MainWindowHandle could be used to do this - how? Mind putting it in another answer? –  Lunivore Sep 24 '10 at 9:37
1  
if Process.MainWindowHandle == IntPtr.Zero it has no main window –  Bear Monkey Sep 24 '10 at 9:51
    
Environment.UserInteractive is for the current process. –  Bear Monkey Sep 24 '10 at 9:54
    
Doh, thanks @Bear Monkey - of course it is. Also for the idea of the MainWindowHandle, will give that a try. –  Lunivore Sep 24 '10 at 11:20

You can simply try and catch the exception:

Process process = ...
try
{
    process.WaitForInputIdle(100);
}
catch (InvalidOperationException ex)
{
    // no graphical interface
}
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Yes, I can... for some reason this seems ugly to me though. Most decent libraries and APIs usually a way of determining whether an operation you're about to perform is valid or not. Microsoft usually provide this. If you don't mind I'll wait a day, see if anyone else has any ideas. –  Lunivore Sep 24 '10 at 9:40
    
I agree, its quite ugly to use exceptions like this –  Bear Monkey Sep 24 '10 at 9:49
    
@Lunivore, @Bear Monkey: It seems to me to be an exception somewhere in between a vexing exception and an exogenous exception. To avoid the exception being thrown you could P/Invoke the WaitForInputIdle function. –  Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Sep 24 '10 at 10:39
    
@Bear Monkey: Good point, though in this specific case you probably won't get any useful information. The WaitForInputIdle function called under the hood simply returns WAIT_FAILED in any of the four error cases. –  Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Sep 24 '10 at 11:16
    
yes your right. I thought it used HRESULTS but it doesn't. I deleted my post before you replied when I realised my mistake. –  Bear Monkey Sep 24 '10 at 11:27

I was think along the lines of this, Still ugly but trys to avoid exceptions.

Process process = ...

bool hasUI = false;

if (!process.HasExited)
{
    try
    {
        hasUI = process.MainWindowHandle != IntPtr.Zero;
    }
    catch (InvalidOperationException)
    {
        if (!process.HasExited)
            throw;
    }
}

if (!process.HasExited && hasUI)
{

    try
    {
        process.WaitForInputIdle(100);
    }
    catch (InvalidOperationException)
    {
        if (!process.HasExited)
            throw;
    }
}
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