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For example in Windows Form, you have textboxes textbox0 to textbox29 and you need to assign them all to an array. What I currently can think of is to do this:

array[0] = textbox0;
array[1] = textbox1;
...
array[29] = textbox29;

Is it possile for me to do sth like this:

for(int i=0; i<30; i++)
{
    array[i] = textbox + i; 
 //and some magic is done such tt this is a variable, eg. textbox1
}
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I am modifying @rdkleine code

Control[] array = new Control[100];
foreach (Control c in FormX.Controls)
{
    int index;
    if (c.Name.StartsWith("textbox") && int.TryParse(c.Name.Substring(7),out index))
    {
        array[index] = c;
    }
}

I think this should place the controls in the correct index in the array.

share|improve this answer
    
Unless there are more then 100 controls. Use Array.Resize(). – Ralf de Kleine Sep 24 '10 at 13:57
1  
Or Control[] array = new Control[Formx.Controls.Count]. This way we will accomodate all the controls. – sh_kamalh Sep 24 '10 at 15:52
    
just realised tt default by Windows Form is start from 1 n also need to cast, so i hv to use array[index-1] = (TextBox)c; – yeeen Sep 27 '10 at 2:36
this.Controls.OfType<TextBox>().ToArray()

should work. It selects the controls which are TextBox and then converts them to an array.

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1  
This could result in the name not correlating with the array index if the controls are out-of-order on the page. For example, array[0] might contain textbox7 etc. Not sure whether or not this would be a problem for the OP. – LukeH Sep 24 '10 at 10:29
1  
Depending on the naming convention you could chain some more LINQ methods together to refine the selection: this.Controls.OfType<TextBox>().Where(c => c.Text.StartsWith("textbox")).OrderBy(c => c.Text).ToArray(); – Andy Rose Sep 24 '10 at 13:48

From the top of my head:

int i = 0;
foreach (Control c in FormX.Controls)
{
    int i2;
    if (c.Name.StartsWith("textbox") && int.TryParse(c.Name.Substring(7),out i2))
    {
        array[i] = c;
        i++;
    }
}
array = array.OrderBy(a => Convert.ToInt32(a.Name.Substring(7))).ToArray();
share|improve this answer
1  
This could result in the name not correlating with the array index if the controls are out-of-order on the page. For example, array[0] might contain textbox7 etc. Not sure whether or not this would be a problem for the OP. – LukeH Sep 24 '10 at 10:29
    
Good one. Added sorting using System.Linq – Ralf de Kleine Sep 24 '10 at 11:17
1  
Sorting will be aplha sorting, meaning You will get textbox1, textbox10, textbox11, textbox12, ..., textbox2, textbox20, ... etc. – cjk Sep 24 '10 at 11:20
    
There you go added sorting on number after textbox – Ralf de Kleine Sep 24 '10 at 11:39
1  
Why don't you initialize the array with a large number say array[100] and instead of saying array[i] = c; say array[i2] = c. This way a control textbox10 will be assigned to array[10]. – sh_kamalh Sep 24 '10 at 13:38

Well, you could use reflection... but personally I'd try to avoid creating all those separate variables to start with. For example, if you really need designer support, you could avoid creating separate variables but create the array by finding the controls by name.

Alternatively, if you can just autogenerate the controls programmatically in a loop, I'd do that.

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