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can we use field event in interface?? i use this and i do not get any error

class Program
{
    public delegate string MyDelegate(string a);
     public  static void Main(string[] args)
    {

    }
   public interface face
   {
       event MyDelegate ab;

  }
}
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3  
Can you provide a sample of what you're trying to do, or explain it a bit better, to avoid we have to guess what you're up to? –  Sander Rijken Sep 24 '10 at 12:14
    
This has been answered, but as an a-side Func<string,string> is the equivalent of your own MyDelegate, you don't necessary have to write your own. –  TheCodeKing Sep 24 '10 at 12:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Interfaces cannot declare fields, but they can declare events.

Interfaces consist of methods, properties, events, indexers, or any combination of those four member types. An interface cannot contain constants, fields, operators, instance constructors, destructors, or types.

See this tutorial for information on how to declare an event in an interface and then implement it in a class:

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Wrong because you can have auto properties in interfaces, which are as good as having fields. In driving class then you will have to have all those properties aka fields. Right because you can not have direct fields. –  Pradeep Sep 24 '10 at 12:19
6  
@Pradeep: No, when you specify a property in an interface, that's just declaring the property - it could be implemented by an automatic property, or it could be implemented in a completely different way. There's nothing tying it to a field just because of the interface. –  Jon Skeet Sep 24 '10 at 12:21

When you declare an event or a property in an interface, this doesn't declare any fields. The event or property can be implemented however you want. Here's an example:

using System;

interface IFoo
{
    int Count { get; set; }
    event EventHandler SomeEvent;
}

class Foo : IFoo
{
    public int Count
    {
        get 
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Count.get called!");
            return 0;
        }
        set
        {  
            Console.WriteLine("Count.set called with value {0}", value);
        }
    }

    public event EventHandler SomeEvent
    {
        add
        {
            Console.WriteLine("SomeEvent.add called");
        }
        remove
        {
            Console.WriteLine("SomeEvent.remove called");
        }
    }
}

class Test
{

    static void Main()
    {
        IFoo f = new Foo();
        int x = f.Count;
        f.Count = 5;
        f.SomeEvent += delegate {};
        f.SomeEvent -= delegate {};
    }
}

In this case, the IFoo interface hasn't declared any fields, and indeed the Foo class doesn't have any fields either.

Now this is very different to when the same declarations are used in a class. For example:

class Bar
{
    int Count { get; set; }
    event EventHandler SomeEvent;
}

In that case, the compiler has autogenerated fields to back the Count property and the SomeEvent event, and created appropriate get/set/add/remove methods for you.

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My guess is that he is asking if he can declare events in interfaces, which is possible. Although I would use EventHandler or EventHandler to follow some kind of standard.

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public interface IEntity
{
   int Id{get;set;}
   string Name{get;set;}
}

You can have fields in form of auto properties. In this case every entity that derives from IEntity got to have these fields/properties.

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The class implementing the interface has to have the property - but it isn't forced to have any fields. –  Jon Skeet Sep 24 '10 at 12:25
    
See my answer for a concrete example of this. –  Jon Skeet Sep 24 '10 at 12:55

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