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Take the following example (created purely to demonstrate the point). What I am trying to do is isolate one part of the system from another and only want to expose a specific subset of the functionality externally from the assembly while internally working against the full objects methods.

This code compiles, but I get an invalid cast exception at runtime. It feels like this should work but unfortunately it does not.

Can anybody suggest an elegant solution to this problem?

UPDATED: Based on comments I have changed this example to better demonstrate the issue, I also in the sample now show the solution that worked for me...

    using System.Collections.Generic;

    namespace Test
    {
        public class PeopleManager
        {
            List<Person> people = new List<Person>();

            public PeopleManager()
            {
            }

            public void CreatePeople()
            {               
                people.Add(new Person("Joe", "111 aaa st"));
                people.Add(new Person("Bob", "111 bbb st"));
                people.Add(new Person("Fred", "111 ccc st"));
                people.Add(new Person("Mark", "111 ddd st"));                
            }

            public IList<IName> GetNames()
            {
                /* ERROR
                 * Cannot convert type 'System.Collections.Generic.List<Test.Person>' 
                 * to 'System.Collections.Generic.List<Test.IName>' c:\notes\ConsoleApplication1\Program.cs
                 */

                return (List<IName>) people; // <-- Error at this line

                // Answered my own question, do the following

                return people.ConvertAll(item => (IName)item);
            }
        }

        public interface IName
        {
            string Name { get; set; }
        }

        internal class Person : IName
        {
            public Person(string name, string address)
            {
                this.Name = name;
                this.Address = address;
            }

            public string Name
            {
                get;
                set;
            }

            public string Address
            {
                get;
                set;
            }
        }
    }
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Can you please only include the snippits that are directly related to your issue? –  David Pfeffer Sep 24 '10 at 13:54
    
Does it have to be an IList? Can it be an IEnumerable? –  Gabe Sep 24 '10 at 14:18
    
Hey Guys, sorry if this wasn't clear but the reason I am casting here is because the class, Person in this instance in my code has 1000's of lines of proprietary logic in it. Within the implementing assembly I want access to all the functionality of the class. However outside the assembly I just want to expose the classes client specific interface.... Doing this worked great for me: List<IName> restricted = people.ConvertAll(item => (IName) item); –  Steve Sheldon Sep 24 '10 at 15:57
    
I thought I would also share this since it relates to the problem of domain mapping. I found a project called AutoMapper which on a larger scale might be a better solution to use. Here is the link for more info: lostechies.com/blogs/jimmy_bogard/archive/2009/01/22/… –  Steve Sheldon Sep 24 '10 at 17:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
IList<IName> restricted = people.Cast<IName>().ToList(); 
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Marked as answer - important to not this is only in .net 3.5 and above. The ConvertAll answer I used in my solution works in .net 2.0 and above. –  Steve Sheldon Sep 24 '10 at 16:35

Person inherits from IName but List<Person> does not inherit from List<IName>. Imagine if it did: you'd be able to cast a List<Person> to its superclass, List<IName>, then add an instance of IName that was not an instance of Person!

Just make your List<Person> a List<IName>--that should be sufficient.

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If I do that, in my internal classes I would have to keep casting the list, thanks though –  Steve Sheldon Sep 24 '10 at 13:58
    
this is the correct answer :) –  vulkanino Sep 24 '10 at 13:59
    
@vulkanino, why do you think this is the "correct" answer? Do you mean to suggest the other solutions somehow won't work? –  Kirk Woll Sep 24 '10 at 14:00
    
Other solutions may work, but jonathan's answer is an example of good OO design, while any cast is not! I know this is a strong assertion, but I think it is true. In you example a Person IS a IName, thanks to polymorphism, and that's one of the reasons Interfaces are so good and so much used. You should strive for a design that won't force you to examine a type in runtime (typeof) or try to cast between types. Instead, you should try to always program to interfaces, not to object instances. –  vulkanino Sep 24 '10 at 14:06
1  
vulkanino: A Person is an IName, but it also has an Address. When somebody who needs an Address gets his List<IName>, they'll have to cast. So how is that design better? –  Gabe Sep 24 '10 at 14:17

Answered my own question but thought I would post in case anybody else runs into this in the future. At the line where the error occurs you can actually do this which is pretty nifty:

List<IName> restricted = people.ConvertAll(item => (IName) item); 
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I prefer Elisha's answer. Operates on IEnumerable<T> so is useful in far more situations. –  Kirk Woll Sep 24 '10 at 13:58
    
good to know :) thanks - here I wanted to use findall so IEnumerable didn't work but generally I agree –  Steve Sheldon Sep 24 '10 at 16:26
    
@Kirk - just good to know, the Cast is .net 3.5 and above, ConvertAll is .net 2.0. My project has to be 2.0 so I couldn't use Cast –  Steve Sheldon Sep 24 '10 at 16:36

I would create a class to wrap the one collection (for performance) rather than make a copy like every other solution on the page.

public class CovariantList<TType, TBase> : IList<TBase>
where TType:TBase,class
{
private IList<TType> _innerList;

public int Count
{
get
{
return this._innerList.Count;
}
}

public TBase this[int index]
{
get
{
return this._innerList[index];
}
set
{
TType type = value as TType;
if(type!=null)
{
...
}
}
...
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