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ISO/IEC 2022 defines the C0 and C1 control codes. The C0 set are the familiar codes between 0x00 and 0x1f in ASCII, ISO-8859-1 and UTF-8 (eg. ESC, CR, LF).

Some VT100 terminal emulators (eg. screen(1), PuTTY) support the C1 set, too. These are the values between 0x80 and 0x9f (so, for example, 0x84 moves the cursor down a line).

I am displaying user-supplied input. I do not wish the user input to be able to alter the terminal state (eg. move the cursor). I am currently filtering out the character codes in the C0 set; however I would like to conditionally filter out the C1 set too, if terminal will interpret them as control codes.

Is there a way of getting this information from a database like termcap?

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1 Answer

The only way to do it that I can think of is using C1 requests and testing the return value:

$ echo `echo -en "\x9bc"`
^[[?1;2c
$ echo `echo -e "\x9b5n"`
^[[0n
$ echo `echo -e "\x9b6n"`
^[[39;1R
$ echo `echo -e "\x9b0x" `
^[[2;1;1;112;112;1;0x

The above ones are:

CSI c      Primary DA; request Device Attributes
CSI 5 n    DSR; Device Status Report
CSI 6 n    CPR; Cursor Position Report
CSI 0 x    DECREQTPARM; Request Terminal Parameters

The terminfo/termcap that ESR maintains (link) has a couple of these requests in user strings 7 and 9 (user7/u7, user9/u9):

# INTERPRETATION OF USER CAPABILITIES
#
# The System V Release 4 and XPG4 terminfo format defines ten string
# capabilities for use by applications, ....   In this file, we use
# certain of these capabilities to describe functions which are not covered
# by terminfo.  The mapping is as follows:
#
#       u9      terminal enquire string (equiv. to ANSI/ECMA-48 DA)
#       u8      terminal answerback description
#       u7      cursor position request (equiv. to VT100/ANSI/ECMA-48 DSR 6)
#       u6      cursor position report (equiv. to ANSI/ECMA-48 CPR)
#
# The terminal enquire string  should elicit an answerback response
# from the terminal.  Common values for  will be ^E (on older ASCII
# terminals) or \E[c (on newer VT100/ANSI/ECMA-48-compatible terminals).
#
# The cursor position request () string should elicit a cursor position
# report.  A typical value (for VT100 terminals) is \E[6n.
#
# The terminal answerback description (u8) must consist of an expected
# answerback string.  The string may contain the following scanf(3)-like
# escapes:
#
#       %c      Accept any character
#       %[...]  Accept any number of characters in the given set
#
# The cursor position report () string must contain two scanf(3)-style
# %d format elements.  The first of these must correspond to the Y coordinate
# and the second to the %d.  If the string contains the sequence %i, it is
# taken as an instruction to decrement each value after reading it (this is
# the inverse sense from the cup string).  The typical CPR value is
# \E[%i%d;%dR (on VT100/ANSI/ECMA-48-compatible terminals).
#
# These capabilities are used by tac(1m), the terminfo action checker
# (distributed with ncurses 5.0).

Example:

$ echo `tput u7`
^[[39;1R
$ echo `tput u9`
^[[?1;2c

Of course, if you only want to prevent display corruption, you can use less approach, and let the user switch between displaying/not displaying control characters (-r and -R options in less). Also, if you know your output charset, ISO-8859 charsets have the C1 range reserved for control codes (so they have no printable chars in that range).

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