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In some of my code I put a series of objects in a list and I build an additional list out of their attributes, which is a string. I need to determine if all the items in this second list have the exact same value, without knowing beforehand which value it is, and return a bool so that I can do different things in my code depending on the result.

I can't know the names of the properties beforehand, that is why I'm trying to make something as generic as possible.

To make the example clear, an ideal function, called "all_same" would work like this:

>>> property_list = ["one", "one", "one"]
>>> all_same(property_list)
True
>>> property_list = ["one", "one", "two"]
>>> all_same(property_list)
False

I was thinking of making a list of unique elements and then check if its length is 1, but I'm not sure if it's the most elegant solution out there.

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marked as duplicate by Elias Zamaria, Bhargav Rao python Mar 3 at 22:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Just realized that I asked the same question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3844801/…. How do I link these two questions? – max Oct 3 '10 at 18:00
up vote 75 down vote accepted
def all_same(items):
    return all(x == items[0] for x in items)

Example:

>>> def all_same(items):
...     return all(x == items[0] for x in items)
...
>>> property_list = ["one", "one", "one"]
>>> all_same(property_list)
True
>>> property_list = ["one", "one", "two"]
>>> all_same(property_list)
False
>>> all_same([])
True
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice, I'll use this one, thanks! – Einar Sep 24 '10 at 14:23
10  
len(set(items)) == 1 is faster. – JulienD May 19 '15 at 9:24
    
@muraveill That would depend greatly on the input. – FogleBird Feb 3 at 16:50
    
This answer has a few shortcommings: it only works with indexables and with equality (and no identity). Hence a slightly improved version: import operator def same(iterable, compare=operator.eq, value_on_empty=True): gen = iter(iterable) start = next(gen, value_on_empty) return all(compare(start, x) for x in gen) This will work with unsized iterable such as generators, allow you to specify what "is the same" mean and what to do on an empty value. – e-satis Mar 6 at 18:11

You could cheat and use set:

def all_same( items ):
    return len( set( items ) ) == 1 #== len( items )

or you could use:

def all_same( items ):
    return all( map(lambda x: x == items[0], items ) )

or if you're dealing with an iterable instead of a list:

def all_same( iterable ):
    it_copy = tee( iterable, 1 )
    return len( set( it_copy) ) == 1
share|improve this answer
    
The set would have just one item, the list would have N. – FogleBird Sep 24 '10 at 14:18
1  
You could use generator expression in the 2nd code. all(x == items[0] for x in items). – kennytm Sep 24 '10 at 14:21
9  
len(set(items)) == 1 definitely most idiomatic. – Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin Sep 24 '10 at 15:05
    
It is also much faster: a = ["a"]*100; a[53]="b". %timeit len(set(a)) == 1 --> 2.83us per loop. %timeit all(x==a[0] for x in a) --> 7.78us per loop. – JulienD May 19 '15 at 9:22
    
@muraveill What machine did you use and can you reproduce those results? I get the opposite relative ordering on both machines I could try: the all() approach is about 3 times faster than the set() approach. – jw013 Jan 13 at 1:46

I originally interpreted you to be testing identity ("the same item"), but you're really testing equality ("same value"). (If you were testing identity, use is instead of ==.)

def all_same(items):
  it = iter(items)
  for first in it:
    break
  else:
    return True  # empty case, note all([]) == True
  return all(x == first for x in it)

The above works on any iterable, not just lists, otherwise you could use:

def all_same(L):
  return all(x == L[0] for x in L)

(But, IMHO, you might as well use the general version—it works perfectly fine on lists.)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I'll have to remember that recipe. – aaronasterling Sep 24 '10 at 14:30
    
@katrielalex: Then you have to try/except for StopIteration; at that point, it's equivalent behavior and the same length. – Roger Pate Sep 24 '10 at 14:48
1  
I prefer try: first = next(it) except StopIteration: return True -- I think the flow is clearer -- but same difference, really. – katrielalex Sep 24 '10 at 14:49
    
@Roger: sorry, noticed that and deleted too late. Indeed! =) – katrielalex Sep 24 '10 at 14:50
    
I like this solution. Even if the OP asked only for lists, generators are so pervasive now in Python that it's better not to assume that the input is a sequence. Note that you can simplify it a bit with Python >= 2.6: first = next(it, None) – tokland Sep 24 '10 at 15:00

This works both for sequences and iterables:

def all_same(items):
  it = iter(items)
  first = next(it, None)
  return all(x == first for x in it)
share|improve this answer
1  
Ah, I was imagining you'd check first is None instead of letting this fall-through. It does give the right result, but I prefer to treat this an error/"exceptional circumstance" instead of depending on later code to silently do the right thing. – Roger Pate Sep 24 '10 at 16:21
    
I know I am very unpythonic in this opinion, but I don't like that a pretty single line turns into four because I have to catch an exception (I speak in general, you used a for/break in you answer). Yeah, I known about EAFP, but still, if I can avoid it... Thanks for the +1, though :-) – tokland Sep 24 '10 at 16:31

Best way to do this is to use Python sets.You need to define all_same like this:

def all_same(items):
    return len(set(items)) == 1

Test:

>>> def all_same(items):
...     return len(set(items)) == 1
... 
>>> 
>>> property_list = ["one", "one", "one"]
>>> all_same(property_list)
True
>>> property_list = ["one", "one", "two"]
>>> all_same(property_list)
False
>>> 
share|improve this answer

This is likely to be faster if you know values are in a list.

def all_same(values):
    return values.count(values[0]) == len(values)
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I created this snippet of code for that same issue after thinking it over. I'm not exactly sure if it works for every scenario though.

def all_same(list):
    list[0]*len(list) == list
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