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is there a cheep method to select the deepest child of an element ?

Example:

<div id="SearchHere">
  <div>
    <div>
      <div></div>
    </div>
  </div>
  <div></div>
  <div>
    <div>
      <div>
        <div id="selectThis"></div>
      </div>
    </div>
  </div>
  <div>
    <div></div>
  </div>
</div>
share|improve this question
    
Not meant as a criticism, but I'm fascinated by why you'd want to? – David Thomas Sep 24 '10 at 14:26
1  
For all those that are finding this through the search engines, I updated the gist from jonathan with the improved version from patrick dw. Also expanded the instructions a little bit. You can find it here: jQuery deepest plugin gist – user789501 Jun 8 '11 at 15:54
up vote 25 down vote accepted

EDIT: This is likely a better approach than my original answer:

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/patrick_dw/xN6d5/5/

var $target = $('#SearchHere').children(),
    $next = $target;

while( $next.length ) {
  $target = $next;
  $next = $next.children();
}

alert( $target.attr('id') );

or this which is even a little shorter:

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/patrick_dw/xN6d5/6/

var $target = $('#SearchHere').children();

while( $target.length ) {
  $target = $target.children();
}

alert( $target.end().attr('id') ); // You need .end() to get to the last matched set

Original answer:

This would seem to work:

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/xN6d5/4/

var levels = 0;
var deepest;

$('#SearchHere').find('*').each(function() {
    if( !this.firstChild || this.firstChild.nodeType !== 1  ) {
        var levelsFromThis = $(this).parentsUntil('#SearchHere').length;
        if(levelsFromThis > levels) {
            levels = levelsFromThis;
            deepest = this;
        }
    }
});

alert( deepest.id );

If you know that the deepest will be a certain tag (or something else), you could speed it up by replacing .find('*') with .find('div') for example.

EDIT: Updated to only check the length if the current element does not have a firstChild or if it does, that the firstChild is not a type 1 node.

share|improve this answer
1  
Awesome! Works perfectly! I've also encapsulated this in a jQuery plugin. Here: gist.github.com/714851 – jonathanconway Nov 25 '10 at 3:28
    
@jonathanconway - Updated my answer with what is likely a more efficient version. – user113716 Nov 25 '10 at 12:23
2  
@user113716 I made even a shorter version jsfiddle.net/xN6d5/44 :) – EaterOfCode Jan 21 '13 at 15:24
1  
I've created a more robust jQuery plugin: .deepest() based on the original answer which works just liked you'd expect, returning a collection of the deepest children of each element in the set of matched elements, optionally filtered by a selector. It is fully chainable and respects the .end() method. View it on CodePen, JSFiddle, Gist – gfullam May 6 '15 at 18:13

I don't think you can do it directly but you can try

var s = "#SearchHere";
while($(s + " >div ").size() > 0)
    s += " > div";
alert( $(s).attr('id') );
share|improve this answer

Here's a slight improvement on the answer from @user113716, this version handles the case when there are no children and returns the target itself.

 (function($) {

    $.fn.deepestChild = function() {
        if ($(this).children().length==0)
            return $(this);

        var $target = $(this).children(),
        $next = $target;

        while( $next.length ) {
          $target = $next;
          $next = $next.children();
        }

        return $target;
    };

}(jQuery));
share|improve this answer

This chainable one-liner worked for me, but it assumes there is only one leaf node in the hierarchy below.

jQuery("#searchBeginsHere")
  .filter(function(i,e){ return jQuery(e).children().size() === 0; })
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