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I'm running this my simple code:

import threading, time

class reqthread ( threading.Thread ):
  def __init__ (self):
    threading.Thread.__init__(self)

  def run ( self ):
    for i in range(0,10):
      time.sleep(1)
      print '.'

try:
  thread=reqthread()
  thread.start()
except (KeyboardInterrupt, SystemExit):
  print '\n! Received keyboard interrupt, quitting threads.\n'

But when i run it, it prints

$ python prova.py  
`
.
.
^C.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Exception KeyboardInterrupt in <module 'threading' from '/usr/lib/python2.6/threading.pyc'> ignored
`

In fact python thread ignore my Ctrl+C keyboard interrupt and doesn't print 'Reiceived Keyboard Interrupt'. Why? What is wrong with this code?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Try

try:
  thread=reqthread()
  thread.daemon=True
  thread.start()
  while True: time.sleep(100)
except (KeyboardInterrupt, SystemExit):
  print '\n! Received keyboard interrupt, quitting threads.\n'

Without the call to time.sleep, the main process is jumping out of the try...except block too early, so the KeyboardInterrupt is not caught. My first thought was to use thread.join, but that seems to block the main process (ignoring KeyboardInterrupt) until the thread is finished.

thread.daemon=True causes the thread to terminate when the main process ends.

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1  
I believe a timeout on join, i.e. while thread.isAlive: thread.join(5) will also work to keep the main thread responsive to exceptions. –  Jan-Philip Gehrcke Sep 11 '12 at 19:51
3  
thread.daemon = True is actually not recommended because it doesn't allow the thread to clean up any resources left behind... –  Erik Allik Sep 29 '13 at 14:47

To summarize the changes recommended in the comments, the following works well for me:

try:
  thread = reqthread()
  thread.start()
  while thread.isAlive(): 
    thread.join(1)  # not sure if there is an appreciable cost to this.
except (KeyboardInterrupt, SystemExit):
  print '\n! Received keyboard interrupt, quitting threads.\n'
  exit()
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