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I have a has_one association that is reflective on the objects of another association. I have Project, which has many ProjectUsers, which tie Projects and Users. One of those ProjectUsers is authoritative. The issue is that both the has_one and the has_many use the same foreign key on project_users. Here's the base idea of the models.

class Project < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :project_users, :class_name => 'ProjectUser', :foreign_key => 'project_id'
  has_one :authoritative_user, :class_name => 'ProjectUser', :foreign_key => 'project_id', :conditions => {:authoritative => true}
end

class ProjectUser < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :project
  belongs_to :user
  # has a boolean column 'authoritative'
end

What I would like to be able to do is call something like.

project = Project.new
project_user = ProjectUser.new
project.project_users << project_user
project.authoritative_user = project_user
other_project_user = ProjectUser.new
project.project_users << other_project_user
project.authoriative_user = other_project_user

Where authoritative_user= would update the project user to have authoritative be set to true, and make the previous authoritative user have authoritative set to false. Another issue I am having is that second time I set authoritative_user on the project, project_id on the previous ProjectUser gets set to nil, and so it is no longer associated though the Project's project_users.

I'm not sure if I'm just doing this completely wrong, or if I'm just missing something.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
class Project < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :project_users
  has_many :users, :through => :project_users

  belongs_to :authoritative_project_user, :class_name => 'ProjectUser'
  has_one    :authoritative_user, :through :authoritative_project_user
end

class  ProjectUser < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :project
  belongs_to :user

  has_one :project_as_authorized_user
end

then just let the has_one project_as_authorized_user relationship nil out your belongs_to authorized_project_user

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Personally, I'd probably look to simplify/separate concerns. Here is an example (note: untested):

class Project < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :project_users
  has_many :users, :through => :project_users
  has_one :authoritative_user
end

class  ProjectUser < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :project
  belongs_to :user
end

class AuthoritativeUser < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :project
  belongs_to :user

  validates_uniqueness_of :user_id, :scope => :project_id
end

Essentially, I break out the authoritative_user attribute of your ProjectUser model into it's own. Very simple, clean and not very exciting.

You could probably build a few convenience methods like has_authoritative_user? and update_authoritative_user in your Project model.

I'm sure you'll get a few better suggestions.

Hope this helps!

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I like this solution if the authoritative_user didn't have to be mutable. I could even see that working if there wasn't other columns on ProjectUser to describe the Project <=> User relationship, and so just the user on AuthoritativeUser could change to reflect who was the authoritative user, but unfortunately, there IS that extra data. I could potentially abstract out all that additional meta data into a separate model, and just associate that with the ProjectUser/AuthoritativeUser. I say potentially, since the actual case for this would require a massive scary refactor of 2 year old code. –  lambdabutz Sep 24 '10 at 20:30
    
Unless I'm missing something, authoritative_user can certainly change (but, there can be only one). In addition, there is no reason why the ProjectUser model can't have additional attributes. After all, that's essentially why the has_many :through relationship exists. –  Brian Sep 24 '10 at 20:52

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