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UPDATE

Here is what I came up with. I haven't tested it yet because it is part of a much larger piece of code that still needs to be ported.

Can you see anything that looks out of place?

private const string tempUserBlock = "%%%COMPRESS~USER{0}~{1}%%%";
string html = "some html";
int p = 0;
var userBlock = new ArrayList();

MatchCollection matcher = preservePatterns[p].Matches(html);
int index = 0;
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
int lastValue = 0;

foreach(Match match in matcher){
    string matchValue = match.Groups[0].Value;

    if(matchValue.Trim().Length > 0) {
        userBlock.Add(matchValue);

        int curIndex = lastValue + match.Index;
        sb.Append(html.Substring(lastValue, curIndex));
        sb.AppendFormat(tempUserBlock, p, index++);

        lastValue = curIndex + match.Length;
    }
}

sb.Append(html.Substring(lastValue));
html = sb.ToString();

ORIGINAL POST BELOW:

Here is the original Java:

private static final String tempUserBlock = "%%%COMPRESS~USER{0}~{1}%%%";
String html = "some html";
int p = 0;
List<String> userBlock = new ArrayList<String>();

Matcher matcher = patternToMatch.matcher(html);
int index = 0;
StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
while (matcher.find())
{
    if (matcher.group(0).trim().length() > 0)
    {
        userBlock.add(matcher.group(0));
        matcher.appendReplacement(sb, MessageFormat.format(tempUserBlock, p, index++));
    }
}
matcher.appendTail(sb);
html = sb.toString();

And my C# conversion so far

private const string tempUserBlock = "%%%COMPRESS~USER{0}~{1}%%%";
string html = "some html";
int p = 0;
var userBlock = new ArrayList();

MatchCollection matcher = preservePattern.Matches(html);
int index = 0;
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

for(var i = 0; i < matcher.Count; ++i){
    string match = matcher[i].Groups[0].Value;
    if(match.Trim().Length > 0) {
        userBlock.Add(match);
        // WHAT DO I DO HERE?
        sb.Append( string.Format(tempUserBlock, p, index++) );            
    }
}
// WHAT DO I DO HERE?
matcher.appendTail(sb);
html = sb.toString();

See comment above, where I ask, "WHAT DO I DO HERE?"

Clarification
The Java code above is performing string replacement on some HTML. It saves the originally replaced text because it needs to be re-inserted later after some whitespace compression is completed.

share|improve this question
    
So what's the problem? –  erickson Sep 24 '10 at 17:20
1  
Can you better define the issue, like, what is the expected result and what is the result you're getting? –  CodingGorilla Sep 24 '10 at 17:21
5  
I'm guessing its the parts marked with // WHAT DO I DO HERE? –  jrummell Sep 24 '10 at 17:21
    
Can you post the full code, it's hard to help with the line below "what do I do here" (which I assume is the question) when we don't know what p or tempUserBlock are –  Christopherous 5000 Sep 24 '10 at 17:23
    
From my very limited understanding of Java I look at this code and I see two notions that should never be seen together: HTML and Regex. If this code is doing what I think it does (parsing HTML with Regex) I would strongly recommend you profiting from the occasion of rewriting this code to do it properly i.e. using a html parser like Html Agility Pack or SGMLReader. Forget about those regexes, stringbuilders, and string trimmings. Do it the right way. –  Darin Dimitrov Sep 24 '10 at 17:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There's no need to reproduce Java's appendReplacement/appendTail functionality; .NET has something better: MatchEvaluator. Check it out:

string holder = "Element {0} = {1}";
string s0 = "111 222 XYZ";
ArrayList arr = new ArrayList();

string s1 = Regex.Replace(s0, @"\d+",
  m => string.Format(holder, arr.Add(m.Value), m.Value)
);

Console.WriteLine(s1);
foreach (string s in arr)
{
  Console.WriteLine(s);
}

output:

Element 0 = 111 Element 1 = 222 XYZ
111
222

There are several ways to implement the MatchEvaluator, all thoroughly discussed in this article. This one (lambda expressions) is by far the coolest.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll check it out in the morning. +1 for programming based on "coolness." –  David Murdoch Sep 26 '10 at 17:47
    
Excellent. This worked very well. Thank you. –  David Murdoch Oct 5 '10 at 14:28

I'm not familiar with the Java regex classes, but this is my C# interpretation of what I think your code does:

private const string tempUserBlock = "%%%COMPRESS~USER{0}~{1}%%%"; 
string html = "some html"; 
int p = 0; 
var userBlock = new List<string>(); 

MatchCollection matcher = preservePattern.Matches(html); 
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); 
int last = 0;
foreach (Match m in matcher)
{
    string match = m.Groups[0].Value; 
    if(match.Trim().Length > 0) { 
        userBlock.Add(match); 
        sb.Append(html.Substring(last, m.Index - last));
        sb.Append(m.Result(string.Format(tempUserBlock, p, index++)));
    }
    last = m.Index + m.Length;
}
sb.Append(html.Substring(last));
html = sb.ToString(); 
share|improve this answer
1  
awesome, that is almost exactly what I came up with! You put the m.Index + m.Length in the correct place. Thanks. I'll let you know how it performs in a bit. –  David Murdoch Sep 24 '10 at 18:13
    
Works perfectly. Thanks! –  David Murdoch Sep 24 '10 at 19:16

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