Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is clean (or should I say performant) SQL achievable in Linq to Sql?

I wanted the Linq to Sql produce this code:

SELECT C.CustomerID, COUNT(O.CustomerID) AS N
FROM Customers C
LEFT JOIN Orders O ON O.CustomerID = C.CustomerID
GROUP BY C.CustomerID

And I follow this code: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/695506/linq-left-join-group-by-and-count

So here's my version of code:

var q = from c in db.Customers
        join o in db.Orders on c.CustomerID equals o.CustomerID into sr
        from x in sr.DefaultIfEmpty()
        group x by c.CustomerID into y
        select new { y.Key, N = y.Count(t => t.CustomerID != null) };

But it generate this...

SELECT [t2].[CustomerID] AS [Key], (
    SELECT COUNT(*)
    FROM [Customers] AS [t3]
    LEFT OUTER JOIN [Orders] AS [t4] ON [t3].[CustomerID] = [t4].[CustomerID]
    WHERE ([t4].[CustomerID] IS NOT NULL) AND ((([t2].[CustomerID] IS NULL) AND ([t3].[CustomerID] IS NULL)) OR (([t2].[CustomerID] IS NOT NULL) AND ([t3].[CustomerID] IS NOT NULL) AND ([t2].[CustomerID] = [t3].[CustomerID])))
    ) AS [N]
FROM (
    SELECT [t0].[CustomerID]
    FROM [Customers] AS [t0]
    LEFT OUTER JOIN [Orders] AS [t1] ON [t0].[CustomerID] = [t1].[CustomerID]
    GROUP BY [t0].[CustomerID]
    ) AS [t2]

...Which I find unacceptable.

Then I try this...

var q = from c in db.Customers
        join o in db.Orders on c.CustomerID equals o.CustomerID into sr
        from x in sr.DefaultIfEmpty()
        group x by c.CustomerID into y                                        
        select new { y.Key, N = y.Sum(t => t.CustomerID != null ? 1 : 0 )};

...and here is the resulting query:

SELECT SUM(
    (CASE
        WHEN [t1].[CustomerID] IS NOT NULL THEN @p0
        ELSE @p1
     END)) AS [N], [t0].[CustomerID] AS [Key]
FROM [Customers] AS [t0]
LEFT OUTER JOIN [Orders] AS [t1] ON [t0].[CustomerID] = [t1].[CustomerID]
GROUP BY [t0].[CustomerID]

Though a little cleaner and look performant, but still not as succint and performant compared to simpler statement: COUNT(O.CustomerID)

Is what I'm trying to do, possible in Linq to SQL?

How about other ORM? notably NHibernate, can it translate the HQL statement to its real SQL?

share|improve this question
2  
People have a hard enough time writing SQL; I don't expect an abstraction layer to be better. – OMG Ponies Sep 24 '10 at 18:36
    
I concur, it seems I will only use ORM for persistence layer. I don't find reporting needs (especially those complex ones) could be met in a straightforward manner by ORMs (or at least in Linq to SQL). Though I want to know if other devs has a certain degree of success on using ORM for their reporting needs – Michael Buen Sep 24 '10 at 18:46
1  
Is it possible you're picking nits? What is the execution plan for these queries? Any chance you're worrying about the SQL just for stylistic purposes and not for practical ones? – mattmc3 Feb 5 '11 at 3:31
    
It's practical, subquery are performance-killers. Not for stylistic purposes, if subquery proves performant, I don't have problems with that – Michael Buen Feb 5 '11 at 5:49
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you generally have to live with what LINQ to SQL generates, but hopefully LINQ to SQL will allow you to ignore the SQL altogether (most of the time) - I find that to be a valuable tradeoff.

Regarding complex reports, I usually drop out of LINQ to SQL and write pure SQL, especially when the query involves lots of database-specific UDF's and the like.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.