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Is it possible to load a python function from a string and then call that function with arguments and get the return value?

I'm using the python C API to run python code from inside my C++ application. I'm able to load a module from a file using PyImport_Import, get a function object from that using PyObject_GetAttrString, and call the function with PyObject_CallObject. What I'd like to do is to load the module/function from a string instead of a file. Is there some equivalent to PyImport_Import which would allow me to pass it a string instead of a file? I need to pass arguments to the function I'm calling and I need access to the return value, so I can't just use PyRun_SimpleString.


Edit:

I found this solution after getting turned on to PyRun_String. I'm creating a new module, getting its dictionary object, passing that along in a call to PyRun_String to define a function in my new module, then getting a function object for that newly created function and calling it via PyObject_CallObject, passing my args. This is what I've found to solve my problem: main.cpp


int main()
{
    PyObject *pName, *pModule, *pArgs, *pValue, *pFunc;
    PyObject *pGlobal = PyDict_New();
    PyObject *pLocal;

    //Create a new module object
    PyObject *pNewMod = PyModule_New("mymod");

    Py_Initialize();
    PyModule_AddStringConstant(pNewMod, "__file__", "");

    //Get the dictionary object from my module so I can pass this to PyRun_String
    pLocal = PyModule_GetDict(pNewMod);

    //Define my function in the newly created module
    pValue = PyRun_String("def blah(x):\n\tprint 5 * x\n\treturn 77\n", Py_file_input, pGlobal, pLocal);
    Py_DECREF(pValue);

    //Get a pointer to the function I just defined
    pFunc = PyObject_GetAttrString(pNewMod, "blah");

    //Build a tuple to hold my arguments (just the number 4 in this case)
    pArgs = PyTuple_New(1);
    pValue = PyInt_FromLong(4);
    PyTuple_SetItem(pArgs, 0, pValue);

    //Call my function, passing it the number four
    pValue = PyObject_CallObject(pFunc, pArgs);
    Py_DECREF(pArgs);
    printf("Returned val: %ld\n", PyInt_AsLong(pValue));
    Py_DECREF(pValue);

    Py_XDECREF(pFunc);
    Py_DECREF(pNewMod);
    Py_Finalize();

    return 0;
}

Here is the rest of my original post, left for posterity:

Here's what I was doing originally: main.cpp:


#include <Python.h>

int main()
{
    PyObject *pName, *pModule, *pArgs, *pValue, *pFunc;

    Py_Initialize();
    PyRun_SimpleString("import sys");
    PyRun_SimpleString("sys.path.append('')");
    pName = PyString_FromString("atest");
    pModule = PyImport_Import(pName);
    Py_DECREF(pName);

    if(pModule == NULL)
    {
        printf("PMod is null\n");
        PyErr_Print();
        return 1;
    }

    pFunc = PyObject_GetAttrString(pModule, "doStuff");
    pArgs = PyTuple_New(1);
    pValue = PyInt_FromLong(4);
    PyTuple_SetItem(pArgs, 0, pValue);

    pValue = PyObject_CallObject(pFunc, pArgs);
    Py_DECREF(pArgs);
    printf("Returned val: %ld\n", PyInt_AsLong(pValue));
    Py_DECREF(pValue);

    Py_XDECREF(pFunc);
    Py_DECREF(pModule);

    Py_Finalize();

    return 0;
}

And atest.py:


def doStuff( x):
    print "X is %d\n" % x
    return 2 * x
share|improve this question
    
It's not necessary to leave your post for posterity. Stack Overflow already has that covered. All edits to questions and answers are automatically archived, which we can see once our points reach a certain level. That helps us rollback bad edits, and trace the changes to better understand questions. So, instead of leaving it there, you can delete your changes and we can look at the edit log if need-be. Because of that, it's not even necessary to put in "Edit:". –  the Tin Man Jan 14 at 20:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

PyRun_String in the Python C API is probably what you're looking for. See: http://docs.python.org/c-api/veryhigh.html

share|improve this answer
1  
It's not clear how I would pass arguments to the function. It does look like I can define a function using PyRun_String, but I don't see how to call it with parameters that aren't just hard-coded string. That is, I could call PyRun_String again with "doStuff(7)" as the first argument, but that won't work if the argument is an object or something like that. Is there some way to call PyObject_GetAttrString to get the function object for doStuff if it's been defined via PyRun_String? –  alanc10n Sep 24 '10 at 20:57
    
Accepting because it started me on the path to finding a solution, though I had to do a lot of reading to get there. Thanks. –  alanc10n Sep 24 '10 at 21:55
    
Sorry, I wasn't online for the last few hours, but it looks like you figured it out exactly. PyRun_String runs a block of Python code from a string and returns whatever the code would have returned -- I presume it's None in your case. After that, the function you've just evaluated is added to the local namespace -- you have to retrieve it from there using PyObject_GetAttrString and then call it. You might also want to check the return value of PyRun_String - if it is NULL, there was an exception while executing the code block. –  Tamás Sep 24 '10 at 22:33

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