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Hey, I'm trying to generate a list of primes below 1 billion. I'm trying this, but this kind of structure is pretty shitty. Any suggestions?

a <- 1:1000000000
d<- 0
b <- for (i in a) {for (j in 1:i) {if (i %% j !=0) {d <- c(d,i)}}}
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4  
Do you need ALL of the primes at once? Seems like you could download them or source them from a place like this if need be: primes.utm.edu/lists/small/millions –  Chase Sep 24 '10 at 19:16
1  
Here you can get the list of primes < 1000000000 prime-numbers.org –  ring0 Sep 25 '10 at 14:49
    
if you simply vectorize your calculations they'll run MUCH faster than a sieve due to the nature of R. (see my answer) –  John Sep 25 '10 at 15:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

This is an implementation of the Sieve of Eratosthenes algorithm in R.

sieve <- function(n)
{
   n <- as.integer(n)
   if(n > 1e6) stop("n too large")
   primes <- rep(TRUE, n)
   primes[1] <- FALSE
   last.prime <- 2L
   for(i in last.prime:floor(sqrt(n)))
   {
      primes[seq.int(2L*last.prime, n, last.prime)] <- FALSE
      last.prime <- last.prime + min(which(primes[(last.prime+1):n]))
   }
   which(primes)
}

 sieve(1000000)
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This is a good implementation of the algorithm but because we're using R it's SLOW... see my response below. –  John Sep 25 '10 at 16:32

Best way that I know of to generate all primes (without getting into crazy math) is to use the Sieve of Eratosthenes.

It is pretty straightforward to implement and allows you calculate primes without using division or modulus. The only downside is that it is memory intensive, but various optimizations can be made to improve memory (ignoring all even numbers for instance).

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You can also cheat and use the primes() function in the schoolmath package :D

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8  
NO! There is a bug in the primes() function in schoolmath pointed at by Neil Gunther! Read here: perfdynamics.blogspot.com/2010/06/… see also here: perfdynamics.blogspot.com/2010/06/… and here: xianblog.wordpress.com/2010/06/14/bug-in-schoolmath –  Henrik Sep 24 '10 at 20:42
    
oh, good link, didn't know. –  nico Sep 24 '10 at 20:48
    
@ Henrik, how about get.primes in library("randtoolbox") ? –  PatrickT Feb 5 at 13:09

I recommend primegen, Dan Bernstein's implementation of the Atkin-Bernstein sieve. It's very fast and will scale well to other problems. You'll need to pass data out to the program to use it, but I imagine there are ways to do that?

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Looks like a C-implementation. With the right tweaking you can incorporate primegen in R without problem (see ?.C) –  Joris Meys Oct 5 '10 at 11:32
    
@Joris: I didn't know you could do that! Thanks for the heads-up. (I was imagining calling it as an external.) –  Charles Oct 5 '10 at 13:09

That sieve posted by gd047 is a good starting point. Here's a much faster version with running times for 1e6 primes of 0.095s as opposed to 30s for the original version.

sieve <- function(n)
{
   n <- as.integer(n)
   if(n > 1e8) stop("n too large")
   primes <- rep(TRUE, n)
   primes[1] <- FALSE
   last.prime <- 2L
   fsqr <- floor(sqrt(n))
   while (last.prime <= fsqr)
   {
      primes[seq.int(2L*last.prime, n, last.prime)] <- FALSE
      sel <- which(primes[(last.prime+1):(fsqr+1)])
      if(any(sel)){
        last.prime <- last.prime + min(sel)
      }else last.prime <- fsqr+1
   }
   which(primes)
}

Here are some alternate algorithms below coded about as fast as possible in R. They are slower than the sieve but a heck of a lot faster than the questioners original post.

Here's a recursive function that uses mod but is vectorized. It returns for 1e5 almost instantaneously and 1e6 in under 2s.

primes <- function(n){
    primesR <- function(p, i = 1){
        f <- p %% p[i] == 0 & p != p[i]
        if (any(f)){
            p <- primesR(p[!f], i+1)
        }
        p
    }
    primesR(2:n)
}

The next one isn't recursive and faster again. The code below does primes up to 1e6 in about 1.5s on my machine.

primest <- function(n){
    p <- 2:n
    i <- 1
    while (p[i] <= sqrt(n)) {
        p <-  p[p %% p[i] != 0 | p==p[i]]
        i <- i+1
    }
    p
}

BTW, the spuRs package has a number of prime finding functions including a sieve of E. Haven't checked to see what the speed is like for them.

And while I'm writing a very long answer... here's how you'd check in R if one value is prime.

isPrime <- function(x){
    div <- 2:ceiling(sqrt(x))
    !any(x %% div == 0)
}
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Your isPrime function is not correct. If you pass 3 in, it returns FALSE. –  mchangun Jul 25 '13 at 7:50
1  
It didn't work with 2 either, and still doesn't. I designed it just for numbers I don't know as a quick check. I was thinking of fixing it with logicals but it's easily fixed for 3, and only made a tiny bit slower, by changing floor to ceiling (done). –  John Nov 4 '13 at 12:50

The isPrime() function posted above could use sieve(). One only needs to check if any of the primes < ceiling(sqrt(x)) divide x with no remainder. Need to handle 1 and 2, also.

isPrime <- function(x) {
    div <- sieve(ceiling(sqrt(x)))
    (x > 1) & ((x == 2) | !any(x %% div == 0))
}
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What package is sieve from? What does it return, and why does this work? –  Matthew Lundberg Jul 13 at 3:35
    
The sieve() function is from the post above by "John." It implements the Sieve of Eratosthenes in R. Are you asking why we only have to check if primes divide and ignore non-primes? That's basic number theory. –  user62081 Jul 13 at 4:23
    
I was not asking that. I thought you were using a function in a publicly-available package, sorry. But that means that this probably shouldn't be an answer, but a comment on John's answer. In addition, I suspect that finding the primes to use for division is so expensive, that you are better off not doing so. As a bonus question, for what values of x do you actually need ceiling rather than floor in this computation? floor is correct mathematically. –  Matthew Lundberg Jul 13 at 4:35
    
Yes, it should be a comment, but I am not allowed to comment on John's answer, since my "reputation" is < 50. The sieve() function John posted is not expensive. If execution time is a concern, than one should use Bernstein's primegen. –  user62081 Jul 13 at 15:58

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