Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This code is simplified as much as I can from a more complex class structure. In the real code, there were sub-types of the Integer and Double types I use here.

I'm trying to use Java Generics with a type parameter. If the user requests the type of Number.class, we want to combine the List<Integer> list and the List<Double> list into a single list.

While the code works, I cannot get ride of the unchecked cast warning (see the TODO tag). The warning is:

Type safety: Unchecked cast from List<Integer> to Collection<? extends T>

But, if I remove the cast, I get a compile error:

The method addAll(Collection<? extends T>) in the type List<T> is not applicable for the arguments (List<Integer>).

My code:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Collection;
import java.util.List;

public class Generics1 {

    static final List<Integer> intList = new ArrayList<Integer>(Arrays.asList(
        1, 2, 3, 4));
    static final List<Double> dblList = new ArrayList<Double>(Arrays.asList(
        1.1, 2.2, 3.3));

    public static <T extends Number> List<T> getObjects(Class<T> type) {
        List<T> outList = new ArrayList<T>();
        if (type == Number.class) {
            // user asked for everything
            // TODO: unchecked cast warnings here should be fixed
            outList.addAll((Collection<? extends T>) intList);
            outList.addAll((Collection<? extends T>) dblList);
        } else {
            // user asked for subtype of number
            if (Integer.class.isAssignableFrom(type)) for (Integer i : intList)
                if (type.isInstance(i)) {
                    T obj = type.cast(i);
                    outList.add(obj);
                }
            if (Double.class.isAssignableFrom(type)) for (Double d : dblList)
                if (type.isInstance(d)) {
                    T obj = type.cast(d);
                    outList.add(obj);
                }
        }
        return outList;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("HI!");
        System.out.println("integers: " + getObjects(Integer.class));
        System.out.println("doubles: " + getObjects(Double.class));
        System.out.println("numbers: " + getObjects(Number.class));
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Is SuppressWarnings("unchecked") enough for you? –  ninjalj Sep 24 '10 at 19:00
    
I forgot to mention, I edited this post to put the generics in the error messages in code blocks, so you can see the generic types being used. –  Powerlord Sep 24 '10 at 20:04
    
thank you for editing the post. –  Bill O. Sep 25 '10 at 2:05
    
p.s. suppressing the warnings is cheating, as i was hoping for an elegant solution, sorry! –  Bill O. Sep 25 '10 at 2:06
add comment

3 Answers 3

You could add this to your code:

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")

Here is another SO post that explains "what" that means: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1129795/what-is-suppresswarnings-unchecked-in-java

And here is another one dealing with conversion of a link that may be useful: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/367626/how-do-i-fix-the-expression-of-type-list-needs-unchecked-conversion

Though with some recoding you could probably make the warning go away completely and not need to be suppressed.

share|improve this answer
add comment
    (Class<T> type)
    List<T> outList = new ArrayList<T>();

    if (type == Number.class) {
        // obviously, T==Number here, though the compiler doesn't know that
        // so we do the cast. compiler will still warn. since the cast makes 
        // perfect sense and is obviously correct, we are ok with it.   
        List<Number> numList = (List<Number>)outList;
        numList.addAll( intList);
        numList.addAll( dblList);
    } else {

The better solution, simply

for list in lists
  for item in list 
     if item instance of type
        add item to result
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, truly I could just use add(), since the addAll() is where I get the compiler warning. If there is no better suggestion for how to supress the warning with addAll(), I will refactor the code to favor add(). –  Bill O. Sep 25 '10 at 2:03
add comment

(previous answer deleted)

Here's a way of doing this with Guava:

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public static <T> List<T> filterAndCollapse(final Class<T> type,
        Collection<?> a, Collection<?> b) {
    List combined = new ArrayList();
    Predicate<Object> filter = new Predicate<Object>() {

        public boolean apply(Object obj) {
            return type.isInstance(obj);
        }
    };
    combined.addAll(Collections2.filter(a, filter));
    combined.addAll(Collections2.filter(b, filter));
    return combined;
}
// ...
filter(Number.class, intList, dblList);

Edit: The fully-type safe way for comparison.

public static <T> List<T> filterAndCollapse(final Class<T> type,
        Collection<?> a, Collection<?> b) {
    List<T> combined = new ArrayList<T>();
    Predicate<Object> filter = new Predicate<Object>() {

        public boolean apply(Object obj) {
            return type.isInstance(obj);
        }
    };
    Function<Object, T> transform = new Function<Object, T>() {

        public T apply(Object obj) {
            return type.cast(obj);
        }
    };
    combined.addAll(Collections2.transform(Collections2.filter(a, filter),
        transform));
    combined.addAll(Collections2.transform(Collections2.filter(b, filter),
        transform));
    return combined;
}

Unfortunately there's no way to filter and transform in one step with Guava, to my knowledge.

share|improve this answer
    
not using generic? List combined = new ArrayList(); –  nanda Sep 24 '10 at 19:32
    
@nanda: Yeah, the reason for that is because the filter will not cast the items to the right type. You can do it, but it takes an extra transform which is runtime overhead, where as this is just a local raw type. I'll add the other back in to compare. –  Mark Peters Sep 24 '10 at 19:36
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.