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boost::condition_variable cond;
boost::mutex mut;

void Database::run()
{
    boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> lock(mut);

    while(true)
    {
        while(queries_queue.empty())
            cond.wait(lock);

        mysqlpp::Query* q = queries_queue.front(); // <<< CRASHES HERE <<<
        q->execute();
        queries_queue.pop_front();
    }
}

void Database::Execute(mysqlpp::Query* q)
{
    {
        boost::lock_guard<boost::mutex> lock(mut);
        queries_queue.push_back(q);
    }
    cond.notify_one();
}

run is executed by boost::thread. Execute is called by main program thread to queue an operation. However, it crashes after waking from the conditional wait.

What am I doing wrong?

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btw, you should give your condition variables a more descriptive name –  sellibitze Sep 24 '10 at 19:18
    
btw2, is it intentional, that the mutex is still locked while the function q->execute() is executed? –  sellibitze Sep 24 '10 at 19:21
    
I don't see anything wrong with it. The error might be somwhere else. –  sellibitze Sep 24 '10 at 19:26
    
I do not know Boost.Threads that well but is it normal that you use lock_guard in one function and unique_lock in the other? –  Václav Zeman Sep 24 '10 at 20:44
    
@wilx: The lock_guard/unique_lock choices are appropriate. –  sellibitze Sep 24 '10 at 21:29

2 Answers 2

Your threading code looks good. The only thing that smells is mixing lock_guard and unique_lock but that is not a big deal. I am 99% sure, however, that your code crashes not where you stated, but on the next line - q->execute();. It seems that caller of the Database::Execute () method is passing a pointer to a query object that is allocated on stack or, if it is allocated dynamically, it deletes it right after function completes. Later, however, your thread retries pointer to that deleted (freed or destructed) object and tries to execute it. Another possibility is that NULL pointer is passed to the Database::Execute () which leads to the same result.

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2  
lock_guard is fine, if he doesn't have to pass the lock object to a condition variable. –  Charles Salvia Sep 24 '10 at 19:32
    
Tried commenting q->execute and delete q out. The crash persisted. But when I removed both references to queries_queue, it worked. –  Vladimir Sep 24 '10 at 20:20
    
@Vladimir: Is there something else accessing queries_queue possibly without locking? Plus, I don't see any delete q; in your example. It would help a lot if you could provide a minimal working code example that crashes. Otherwise it is always guessing. But the problem is definitely not in the threading code you have provided so far. –  user405725 Sep 25 '10 at 14:30

try

while(true)
{
    boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> lock(mut);
    while(queries_queue.empty())
        cond.wait(lock);
share|improve this answer
    
Makes no sense to re-lock the mutex. That is what condition::wait for meant for. –  user405725 Sep 24 '10 at 19:24
    
@Vlad: I think aaa means moving the boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> lock(mut); from function scope to while(true) scope in Database::run not adding another one. –  Eugen Constantin Dinca Sep 24 '10 at 21:12
    
@Eugen: Exactly, and that will introduce lock/unlock on every interation of while loop. Which is very harmful. –  user405725 Sep 25 '10 at 14:25

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