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I do a lot of programming in Perl and was wondering if people had a "default" template Perl script that they use and willing to share.

I started copying one of my older scripts which has Getopt functions. I am thinking people would have done something similar?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As people say before I have my methods templates in a module: use PMG::PMGBase; and for the initial script escafolding, as an emacs user, I have my perl-insert-start and perl-add-getoption templates, but writing things like:

(defun perl-insert-start ()
  "Places #!..perl at the start of the script"
  (interactive)
  (goto-char (point-min))
  (insert "#!/usr/bin/env perl\n\n")
  (insert "=head1 [progam_name]\n\n")
  (insert " description:\n\n")
  (insert "=cut\n\n")
  (insert "use feature ':5.10';\n")
  (insert "use strict;\n")
  (insert "#use warnings;\n")
  (insert "#use Data::Dumper;\n")
)

is a bit tiresome. So at the end is easier for me to have a Perl template script (see below), and call it with run-command-on-region: C-u M-| :~/scripts/perl-start-template.pl from Emacs after selecting one space in a blank buffer:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

=head1 [progam_name]

 description:

=cut

use feature ':5.10';
use strict;
use Getopt::Long;

my $prog = $0;
my $usage = <<EOQ;
Usage for $0:

  >$prog [-test -help -verbose]

EOQ

my $help;
my $test;
my $debug;
my $verbose =1;


my $ok = GetOptions(
                    'test'      => \$test,
                    'debug:i'   => \$debug,
                    'verbose:i' => \$verbose,
                    'help'      => \$help,
                   );

if ($help || !$ok ) {
    print $usage;
    exit;
}


print template();


sub template {
    ##
    ### Here start the template code
    ##
    return <<'EOT';
#!/usr/bin/env perl

=head1 [progam_name]

 description: This script prints a template for new perl scripts

=cut

use feature ':5.10';
use strict;
#use warnings;
#use Data::Dumper;
use Getopt::Long;
# use Template;
# use PMG::PMGBase;  
# use File::Temp qw/ tempfile tempdir /;
# use File::Slurp;
# use File::Copy;
# use File::Path;
# use File::Spec;
# use File::Basename qw(basename dirname);
# use List::Util qw(reduce max min);
# use List::MoreUtils qw(uniq indexes each_arrayref natatime);

# my $PMGbase = PMG::PMGBase->new();
my $prog = $0;
my $usage = <<EOQ;
Usage for $0:

  >$prog [-test -help -verbose]

EOQ

my $date = get_date();

my $help;
my $test;
my $debug;
my $verbose =1;

my $bsub;
my $log;
my $stdout;
my $stdin;
my $run;
my $dry_run;

my $ok = GetOptions(
                    'test'      => \$test,
                    'debug:i'   => \$debug,
                    'verbose:i' => \$verbose,
                    'help'      => \$help,
                    'log'       => \$log,
                    'bsub'      => \$bsub,
                    'stdout'    => \$stdout,
                    'stdin'     => \$stdin,

                    'run'       => \$run,
                    'dry_run'   => \$dry_run,

                   );

if ($help || !$ok ) {
    print $usage;
    exit;
}

sub get_date {

    my ($day, $mon, $year) = (localtime)[3..5] ;

    return my $date= sprintf "%04d-%02d-%02d", $year+1900, $mon+1, $day;
}

sub parse_csv_args {

    my $csv_str =shift;
    return [split ',', $csv_str];
}

EOT


}
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Mine is pretty simple.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use Modern::Perl

When it comes to things like getopt, there aren't enough commonalities among the scripts I write to make it worth while having a more verbose template.

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1  
Bleh, great suggestion, but Modern::Perl doesn't enough... –  Evan Carroll Sep 24 '10 at 19:52
    
You might want to make that #!/usr/bin/perl or even #!/usr/bin/env perl. –  Chas. Owens Sep 24 '10 at 19:55
1  
@Evan — that's subjective –  Quentin Sep 24 '10 at 20:11
1  
@Chas — no, not for the systems I target primarily. –  Quentin Sep 24 '10 at 20:11
3  
There is no such thing as "the end-all perl template". Just a template that suits a given purpose. –  Quentin Sep 24 '10 at 20:36

When I need a basic template for many similar scripts, I just turn the similar parts into a module. The script then reduces to something like:

 use App::Foo;

 App::Foo->run( @ARGV );

The App::Foo would inherit from the template module and override whatever was different:

 package App::Foo;
 use parent qw(App::Template);

 ...

In the App::Template module, you put in whatever you need:

 package App::Template;

 sub run {
    my( $class, @args ) = @_;

    my $self = $class->new( ... );
    $self->init;
    $self->process_command_line( ... );

    ...
    }


 sub process_command_line { ... }

 ...

There are some frameworks on CPAN for this sort of thing, but I think it's just as easy to do it yourself and get exactly what you need without dealing with the parts you don't need.

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In my .vimrc file I have

au BufNewFile *.pl s-^-#!/usr/bin/perl\r\ruse strict;\ruse warnings;\r\r-

which writes

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

to any new Perl script. I also have

au BufNewFile *.pm s-^-package XXX;\r\ruse strict;\ruse warnings;\r\r1;-

for modules, but I tend to use Module::Starter for those anyway.

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Perhaps an ignorant question, but why \r rather than \n? –  Telemachus Sep 25 '10 at 16:03
5  
@Telemachus Because that is what works? Vim can be a strange beast sometimes. –  Chas. Owens Sep 25 '10 at 17:50
    
That's what I get for not testing. Yet another thing about Vim I never knew (noticed, came across) before. For other visitors, see stackoverflow.com/questions/71323/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/71417/why-is-r-a-newline-for-vim –  Telemachus Sep 25 '10 at 18:11
    
In perl 5.11, use strict; is default when use 5.11.0; –  kagali-san Sep 27 '10 at 2:02
    
@mhambra Well, since Perl 5.11 is a dev version, it is probably better to say in Perl 5.12 strict is turned on by default if you say use 5.012;. Unfortunately, I still write a lot of code for Perl 5.8, so I have not updated my template yet. –  Chas. Owens Sep 27 '10 at 13:38

I have two. An old one which is little more than a wrapper to a perl one-liner and a second that has more functions and examples that I often find useful:

#!/usr/bin/perl
# name_of_script ver 0.01 YYYYMMDD authors@email.address
use strict;
no strict "refs";


sub footer
{
    my $this_year=`date +%Y`; chop($this_year);
    print "Copyright 2003-$this_year You or Company\n";
    # This isn't how copyright works -  the dates cove the time when the code
    #  was created.
}

sub help
{
    print "Usage: $0\n";
    &footer;
exit(0);
}

if( ($ARGV[0] =~ /^-+h/i) || (!$ARGV[0]) )
{
    &help;
}
##### code


##### end of code
print "Done that\n";

exit(0);

I use the above for quick test but more often I use the following, (when I'm not hacking a full module.)

#!/usr/bin/perl
# name_of_script ver 0.01 YYYYMMDD authors@email.address
use strict;
{
no strict "refs"; # this helps bypass frustration when I'm doing it wrong.
}

=head1 NAME

name_of_script

=head1 VERSION

0.01

=cut

our $VERSION = 0.01;

=head1 ABSTRACT

A synopsis of the new script

=head1 DESCRIPTION

Provide an overview of functionality and purpose of
this script

=head1 OPTIONS

%opt stores the global variables
%ignore overrides %opt

=cut

my (%opt,%ignore);

=head2 ARGS

=over 8

=item B<-h> send for help (just spits out this POD by default, but we can chose something else if we like 

=back

=head3 other arguments and flags that are valid

For when GetOpt is too heavy

-d -v -i[!] (value) 

=cut

for(my $args=0;$args<=(@ARGV -1);$args++){
    if ($ARGV[$args]=~m/^-+h/i){ &help; }
    elsif ($ARGV[$args] eq '-d'){ $opt{D}++; }
    elsif ($ARGV[$args] eq '-v'){ $opt{verbose}++;  print "Verbose output not implemented yet - try debug\n";}
    elsif ($ARGV[$args]=~m/-+i!(.+)/){ delete($ignore{$1}); }
    elsif ($ARGV[$args]=~m/-+record(.+)/){ $opt{record_data}++; }
    elsif ($ARGV[$args]=~m/-+w(ipe_home_dirs)?/){ $opt{wipe_home_dirs}++; }
    elsif ($ARGV[$args]=~m/-+i(.+)/){ $ignore{$1}=1; }
    elsif ($ARGV[$args]=~m/-+path(.+)/){ $opt{BASE_PATH} = $1; }
    elsif ($ARGV[$args]=~m/-+path/){ $args++; $opt{BASE_PATH} = $ARGV[$args]; }
    elsif ($ARGV[$args]=~m/-+dir(.+)/){ $opt{BASE_PATH} = $1; }
    elsif ($ARGV[$args] eq '-no-xml'||$ARGV[$args] eq '-no_xml'){ delete $opt{xml}; }
    elsif ($ARGV[$args] eq '-no-mkdir'||$ARGV[$args] eq '-no_mkdir'){ delete $opt{mkdir}; }
    elsif ($ARGV[$args] !~m/^-/ && -d "$ARGV[$args]"){ push @{ $opt{paths} }, $ARGV[$args] }
    else{ print "what is this $ARGV[$args] you talk of?\n"; &help; }
}


=head1 METHODS

=head3 footer

Adds the Copyright line to any output that needs it

=cut

sub footer { print "perldoc $0 \nCopyright 2011 You or Company\n"; }

=head3 help

Just the help output

=cut

sub help {
    print `perldoc $0`;
    #print "Usage: $0\n";
    #&footer;
    exit(0);
}

##### code


##### end of code

=head1 BUGS AND LIMITATIONS

There are no known problems with this script.
Please report any bugs or feature requests

=head1 SEE ALSO

#L<My::Modules>

=head1 MAINTAINER

is the AUTHOR

=head1 AUTHOR

Some Person, C<<some.person at example.com>>

=head1 LICENSE AND COPYRIGHT

Copyright 2011 Alexx Roche, all rights reserved.

This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
under the terms of either: Eclipse Public License, Version 1.0 ; 
 the GNU Lesser General Public License as published 
by the Free Software Foundation; or the Artistic License.

See http://www.opensource.org/licenses/ for more information.

=cut

print "Done that\n" if $opt{verbose}>=1;
exit(0);
__END__

__END__ is usually only used if we are going to have POD after the code If you move the "Done that" above the POD then __END__ makes more sense to me.

Feel free to hack these two about as much as you like. I make no claims to good style or practices here, (and I sometimes start with the short one and paste in blocks from the longer one as I need them ending up with two code styles for the trolols.)

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