Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a question relating to Perl dynamic code. Is there a construct in Perl where I could use to execute code.

For instance,

$command = " some command";
$perl -> execute($command);

$command changes in run time . Sorry for my terminology. I do not know how to explain it otherwise.

I am trying to accomplish this: I have a function which execute some command for each reference in a array.

 ...insert example call to function...

Let's say each reference has an identifier associated.

 ...insert sample reference...
 ...say something about how you determine the identifier...
 ...say something about how you want to use the identifier...

I can't iterate through the array and execute for every reference since a portion of the command varies for each reference as it has a part of the identifier and there is no exhaustive list of identifiers. For instance if $r0 has an identifier 'r0', the command $r0->test("r0") should be executed.

share|improve this question
1  
Fill in the bits I've indicated. :) –  brian d foy Sep 24 '10 at 21:10
add comment

2 Answers

If this is an external command, you can use one of system, backticks, or a Perl module for that sort of thing.

If you want to compile and execute Perl code at run time, you can use eval. In many cases, people abuse eval because they don't see the simpler way to get things done.

If you want to decide which subroutine to run based on the situation, you can do various things, including using soft references (ick!, but useful sometimes), dispatch tables, and so on.

If you want to choose a method based on the value in a variable, that's easy too:

 $object->$method(...)

However, you'd have to tell us what you are trying to accomplish.


I'm still not sure what you are asking, but it doesn't really sound like anything dynamic. I think this is the situation you are describing. Tell me how close this is:

 my @array = ( [ 'r0', 'foo', 'bar' ] );

 foreach my $element ( @array ) {
      my( $identifier, @other_stuff ) = @$element;
      $element->test( $identifier );
      }

It would really help if you can show some sample elements and a more complete, if even pseudo code, outline of what you have. We only know what you tell us in your question, not everything you know about your own problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks brian. I am trying to accomplish this: I have a function which execute some command for each reference in a array. Lets say each reference has an identifier associated. I can't iterate through the array and execute for every reference since a portion of the command varies for each reference as it has a part of the identifier and there is no exhaustive list of identifiers. For instance if $r0 has an identifier 'r0', the command $r0->test("r0") 'should be executed –  Sinduja Sep 24 '10 at 20:46
    
Edit your question to include additional or clarifying information. Show us an example of these array elements and how the identifier maps onto code. The more info you give us, the more we can help. –  brian d foy Sep 24 '10 at 20:47
    
I have posted the edited question –  Sinduja Sep 24 '10 at 20:51
    
I think you edited your comment, not your question. I've fixed that for you. –  brian d foy Sep 24 '10 at 21:03
    
@Sinduja: Your example in the comment does not need eval as far as I can tell. I guess it depends what $r0->test("r0") does, but your example implies that a) you parse out r0 from a scalar $r0 (or from the name of the scalar?) then b) run a test $r0->test("r0") using the text of the scalar's name? You don't need eval to do that... –  dawg Sep 25 '10 at 17:22
add comment

You can use eval:

eval($command);

From the manual:

eval EXPR

In the first form, the return value of EXPR is parsed and executed as if it were a little Perl program...

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, but i'd rather you don't. I think it's very creepy. –  Powertieke Sep 24 '10 at 20:29
    
Thank you so much. –  Sinduja Sep 24 '10 at 20:29
    
"need" is a bit strong. We don't even really know what he's doing yet. –  brian d foy Sep 24 '10 at 20:48
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.