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I'm trying to compile the following code under VC2010.

struct CircValRange
{
    double a,b; // range: [a,b)
};

template <struct CircValRange* Range>
class CircVal
{
    // todo
};


const CircValRange SignedDegRange= {-180., 180.};

CircVal<SignedDegRange> x;

I'm getting

error C2970: 'CircVal' : template parameter 'Range' : 'SignedDegRange' : an expression involving objects with internal linkage cannot be used as a non-type argument
1>          d:\4\circval\circval\circval.h(8) : see declaration of 'CircVal'
1>          d:\4\circval\circval\circval.h(13) : see declaration of 'SignedDegRange'

I am trying to define a templated class CircVal that will receive a struct Range as the templated parameter.

I don't want it to be possible to assign classes with one range to classes with another range (I want them to be different types).

How can I do it?

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Have you tried CircValRange range instead of struct CircValRange* Range for the type parameter? –  Reinderien Sep 24 '10 at 21:23
    
Tried. Won't work. –  Lior Kogan Sep 24 '10 at 21:35
    
Why do you need to prevent different ranges form being assigned? It sounds like you're making it harder than necessary. –  JoshD Sep 24 '10 at 22:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Someone has recommended a constructor parameter, which I second. But you can still do it as originally desired

struct CircValRange
{
    double a,b; // range: [a,b)
};

template <CircValRange const& Range>
class CircVal
{
    // todo
};


extern const CircValRange SignedDegRange= {-180., 180.};

CircVal<SignedDegRange> x;

But notice that the property that determines the type-identity of CircVal<SignedDegRange> is not the value of SignedDegRange, but the address/identity of it. That is, the following does not work because CircVal<SignedDegRange1> denotes a different type

extern const CircValRange SignedDegRange1 = {-180., 180.};

CircVal<SignedDegRange1> y = x; // error!

As such, an enumeration may be better suited for this

enum RangeKind {
  SignedDegRange,
  UnsignedDegRange
};

const CircValRange Ranges[] = { { -180., -180. }, { 0., 360. } };

template <RangeKind Range>
class CircVal
{
    // todo
};

Or even a traits class with static member functions, similar to a solution someone else had

template <typename Range>
class CircVal
{
    // todo
};

struct SignedDegRange {
  static double min() { return -180.; }
  static double max() { return  180.; }
};

CircVal<SignedDegRange> x;
share|improve this answer
    
I had to remove "extern const" from your 1st example. I'm not sure why it won't compile with "const", so I can't protect SignedDegRange from being changed at runtime. Moreover, the compiler won't be able to optimize for real consts. I guess I'll go with your 3rd example, which probably supports better compiler optimization. –  Lior Kogan Sep 25 '10 at 6:21
    
How do I use the Range in the 3rd example? Adding the following constructor to CircVal won't compile: CircVal() { double d= Range.min(); } –  Lior Kogan Sep 25 '10 at 6:33
    
Ok. figured it out. Just Add static Range range; to my class, and CircVal() { double d= range.min() }. –  Lior Kogan Sep 25 '10 at 6:46
    
@Lior it will compile with extern const if you change the template parameter to be const too. You can use the Range in my third example by just saying Range::min() and Range::max() of course since they are static member functions. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 25 '10 at 10:06

Instead of making it a template, why don't you reqire a range as a constructor parameter?


struct CircValRange
{
    double a,b; // range: [a,b)
};

class CircVal
{
public:
    CircVal(const CircValRange &_range) : range(_range) {}
private:
    CircValRange range;
    // todo
};


const CircValRange SignedDegRange= {-180., 180.};

CircVal x(SignedDegRange);

That way each instance of a CircVal will have an associated range. Then you can override the assignment opearator to prevent assignment with different values.

Or, if you're interested in a different way with templates, you could do something like this for a range:

template <int MIN, int MAX>
class range {
  static const int min = MIN, max = MAX;
};
template <class T>
class CircVal {
  //todo
};

CircVal< range<10,20> > x;

But of course, that's not very clean or usable.

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Thanks for your suggestions. For your 1st suggestion: Overriding the assignment operator won't give me compile-time errors. For your 2st suggestion: It won't work for doubles. –  Lior Kogan Sep 25 '10 at 5:55
template <class Range>
class CircVal
{
    // todo
};

or

template <class Range> class CircVal;
template<>
class CircVal<CircValRange> {...

to instantiate

CircVal<CircValRange> ...
share|improve this answer
    
Tried. Won't work. –  Lior Kogan Sep 24 '10 at 21:37

I think you are omitting one step. If you want to create a template CircVal that you can specialise on a type, you write:

template<typename Range>
class CircVal
{
   ...
};

and if you then want to specialise it on CircValRange, you create an instance of it as you do further down in your code.

What you seem to try and enforce is that it'll only accept classes derived from a certain base class but unfortunately that's not quite the way templates work - you'll have to find another way to enforce that, maybe by duck typing.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to create different class types for different ranges, so it won't be possible to assign one to another. –  Lior Kogan Sep 24 '10 at 21:40
    
It's not by default possible to assign two different instantiations of the same template, e.g. Foo<T> to Foo<S>, unless you go out of your way to write an assignment operator to do that. I think you're overcomplicating this for yourself. –  Tyler McHenry Sep 24 '10 at 21:47
    
I'm not able to write a compilable code based on your suggestion. Can you add a full example please? –  Lior Kogan Sep 24 '10 at 21:59

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