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What are these abbreviations for? Disk space Free? Disk Usage?

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closed as off topic by Quentin, Mark Ransom, Matthew Flaschen, 0xA3, Graviton Sep 25 '10 at 2:11

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That's generally how most people think of them, yes, but note that unix commands aren't necessarily abbreviations. They're simply intended to be short and quick to type. If that can be done in a manner that closely preserves the name, bonus.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Df_(Unix): df (abbreviation for disk free) is a standard Unix computer program used to display the amount of available disk space for filesystems.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Du_(Unix): du (abbreviated from disk usage) is a standard Unix program used to estimate the file space usage—space used under a particular directory or files on a file system.

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  • df = disk free
  • du = disk usage

The general purpose of these utilities should be available in the man pages:

man du df

(if you have man pages installed!) Having said that, on Linux, the man pages say:

  • du - estimate file space usage
  • df - report file system disk space usage

which isn't as helpful as all that.

OTOH, the Unix Version 7 manual pages said:

  • df – disk free
  • du – summarize disk usage
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df = disk free
du = disk usage

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