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I am trying to retrieve the data from the table and convert each row into CSV format like

s12, james, 24, 1232, Salaried

The below code does the job, but takes a long time, with tables of rows exceeding 1,00,000.

Please advise on optimizing technique:

 while(rset1.next()!=false) {
                         sr=sr+"\n";
                        for(int j=1;j<=rsMetaData.getColumnCount();j++)
                        {
                            if(j< 5)
                            {
                         sr=sr+rset1.getString(j).toString()+",";
                            }
                            else
                          sr=sr+rset1.getString(j).toString();
                        }

                       }

/SR

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1  
Why don't you export the csv directly from DB? –  ruslik Sep 24 '10 at 23:38
    
@ruslik: couldn't agree more. You ain't ever going to do it faster in Java than a bit decent DB can do. –  BalusC Sep 25 '10 at 0:18
    
PLEASE WRITE THE TITLE MORE DESCRIPTIVELY. –  OTZ Sep 25 '10 at 4:49
    
Also look at stackoverflow.com/questions/101100/csv-api-for-java this will give you some more information how to write read csv in java –  Jaydeep Patel Sep 25 '10 at 6:39

7 Answers 7

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Two approaches, in order of preference:

Stream the output

PrintWriter csvOut = ... // Construct a write from an outputstream, say to a file
while (rs.next())
    csvOut.println(...) // Write a single line

(note that you should ensure that your Writer / OutputStream is buffered, although many are by default)

Use a StringBuilder

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
while (rs.next())
    sb.append(...) // Write a single line

The idea here is that appending Strings in a loop is a bad idea. Imagine that you have a string. In Java, Strings are immutable. That means that to append to a string you have to copy the entire string and then write more to the end. Since you are appending things a little bit at a time, you will have many many copies of the string which aren't really useful.

If you're writing to a File, it's most efficient just to write directly out with a stream or a Writer. Otherwise you can use the StringBuilder which is tuned to be much more efficient for appending many small strings together.

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No, file IO is SLOW, buffering the writes would perform much faster. –  arthurprs Sep 24 '10 at 22:53
1  
@arthurprs: unless you are using a raw OutputStream, nearly all IO operations in Java are already buffered. If you fear this, you can always use a BufferedOutputStream or a BufferedWriter. It's generally considered much faster to stream out data than build a huge intermediate value and then copy it out. –  Steven Schlansker Sep 24 '10 at 22:55
    
It's possible the result String/StringBuilder is getting so large that the JVM is running out of heap space, leading to overactive garbage collection. Maybe try java -Xms512m -Xmx512m –  Greg Case Sep 24 '10 at 22:56
2  
@gregcase: if you're building a half-gig String object you really should try for a streaming approach instead. –  Steven Schlansker Sep 24 '10 at 22:57
1  
+1 cuz this should have been the accepted answer. –  Sayed Ibrahim Hashimi Sep 25 '10 at 4:54

I'm no Java expert, but I think it's always bad practice to use something like getColumnCount() in a conditional check. This is because after each loop, it runs that function to see what the column count is, instead of just referencing a static number. Instead, set a variable equal to that number and use the variable to compare against j.

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ok.. i will try and let you know. –  user414977 Sep 24 '10 at 22:50
1  
@user414977: A decent compiler should be able to inline .getColumnCount() and reference the variable behind the function call directly. Additionally, the time needed to refer to the variable once per loop is far defeated by the time you wasted on copying string over and over, instead of using StringBuilder. –  Lie Ryan Sep 25 '10 at 0:53
    
What he said. If I were you, I'd accept the answer from Steven Schlansker. I'm not even a Java programmer. –  treeface Sep 25 '10 at 1:35

You might want to use a StringBuilder to build the string, that's much more efficient when you're doing a lot of concatenation. Also if you have that much data, you might want to consider writing it directly to wherever you're going to put it instead of building it in memory at first, if that's a file or a socket, for example.

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Will try your option. The basic requirement is that its should not be written on to a file. –  user414977 Sep 24 '10 at 22:56
StringBuilder sr = new StringBuilder();
int columnCount =rsMetaData.getColumnCount();
while (rset1.next()) {
    sr.append('\n');
    for (int j = 1; j <= columnCount; j++) {
        sr.append(rset1.getString(j));
        if (j < 5) {
        sr.append(',');
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is as good of a solution you will get, although I'm not sure the changes will actually show a noticeable performance improvement. The only change I would make is changing the while to while(rset1.next()) –  Greg Case Sep 24 '10 at 23:01
    
@gregcase: Thanks! I didn't notice the '!= false' part. I have edited and fixed it. –  Skip Head Sep 25 '10 at 0:02
    
Also, I imagine the 'j < 5' should be 'j < columnCount', but it's impossible to tell for sure. –  Skip Head Sep 25 '10 at 0:05

As a completely different, but undoubtely the most optimal alternative, use the DB-provided export facilities. It's unclear which DB you're using, but as per your question history you seem to be doing a lot with Oracle. In this case, you can export a table into a CSV file using UTL_FILE.

See also:

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I agree using the data export module is the best way, because 1. it will handle any weird escaping 2. it will certainly execute quicker 3. you can dump the work on the DBAs :-D and move on to something else. –  Tony Ennis Sep 25 '10 at 13:22

As the other answers say, stop appending to a String. In Java, String objects are immutable, so each append must do a full copy of the string, turning this into an O(n^2) operation.

The other is big slowdown is fetch size. By default, the driver is likely to fetch one row at a time. Even if this takes 1ms, that limits you to a thousand rows per second. A remote database, even on the same network, will be much worse. Try calling setFetchSize(1000) on the Statement. Beware that setting the fetch size too big can cause out of memory errors with some database drivers.

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With some databases (at least Postgres JDBC) it defaults to retrieving the entire set, not one row at a time. That said your suggestion is still very useful as for a lot of rows that can easily OOM. –  Steven Schlansker Sep 25 '10 at 5:39

I don't believe minor code changes are going to make a substantive difference. I'd surely use a StringBuffer however.

He's going to be reading a million rows over a wire, assuming his database is on a separate machine. First, if performance is unacceptable, I'd run that code on the database server and clip the network out of the equation. If it's the sort of code that gets run once a week as a batch job that may be ok.

Now, what are you going to do with the StringBuffer or String once it is fully loaded from the database? We're looking at a String that could be 50 Mbyte long.


This should be 1 iota faster since it removes the unneeded (i<5) check.

StringBuilder sr = new StringBuilder();
int columnCount =rsMetaData.getColumnCount();
while (rset1.next()) {
    for (int j = 1; j < columnCount; j++) {
        sr.append(rset1.getString(j)).append(",");
        }
    // I suspect the 'if (j<5)' really meant, "if we aren't on the last
    // column then tack on a comma." So we always tack it on above and
    // write the last column and a newline now.
    sr.append(rset1.getString(columnCount)).append("\n");
    }
}

Another answer is to change the select so it returns a comma-sep string. Then we read the single-column result and append it to the StringBuffer.

I forget the syntax now, but something like:

select column1 || "," || column2 || "," ... from table;

Now we don't need to loop and comma concatenation business.

StringBuilder sr = new StringBuilder();
while (rset1.next()) {
    sr.append(rset1.getString(1)).append("\n");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I think you mean select column1 || ',' || column2 || ',' ... –  Steven Schlansker Sep 25 '10 at 0:20
    
Yes, thanks for the syntax assist. I don't have a DB running here at home to try it. –  Tony Ennis Sep 25 '10 at 0:38

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