Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Currently I am working on a project where goto statements are heavely used. The main purpose of goto statements is to have one cleanup section in routine rather than multiple return statements. Like below

BOOL foo()
{
   BOOL bRetVal = FALSE;
   int *p=NULL;

   p = new int;
   if(p==NULL)
   {
     cout<<" OOM \n";
     goto Exit;
   }

   // Lot of code...
Exit:
   if(p)
   {
     delete p;
     p= NULL;
   }
   return bRetVal;
}

This makes much easier as we can track our clean up code at one section in code.ie after Exit label.

However I have read many places its bad practice to have goto statements.

Currently I am reading Code Complete book and it says that we need to use variable close to their declarations. If we use goto then we need to declare/initialize all variables before first use of goto otherwise compiler give errors that initialization of xx variable is skipped by goto statement.

I am not sure which way is right. any thoughts???


From Scott's comment It looks like using goto to jump from one section to another is bad as it make the code hard to read and understand.

But if we use goto just to go forward and to one label then it should be fine???

share|improve this question
13  
My thoughts: Make up your mind about which language you're using. C++ has better tools available to guarantee clenaup (RAII, as mentioned below), but C doesn't, and in C, using goto in the manner you describe is very common. –  jalf Dec 18 '08 at 21:39
2  
Goto makes the code unsafe to use in the presence of Exceptions. If you use RIAA it will do the cleanup for you and is exception safe. –  Loki Astari Dec 18 '08 at 21:54
7  
@Martin York: The RIAA won't do your cleanup, only sue you. ;-) –  John Zwinck Dec 18 '08 at 23:44
5  
I pray to dog everyday to fix that ;-) –  Loki Astari Dec 19 '08 at 6:14

35 Answers 35

A few years ago I came up with a pseudo-idiom that avoids goto, and is vaguely similar to doing exception handling in C. It has been probably already invented by someone else so I guess I "discovered it independently" :)

BOOL foo()
{
   BOOL bRetVal = FALSE;
   int *p=NULL;

   do
   {
       p = new int;
       if(p==NULL)
       {
          cout<<" OOM \n";
          break;
       }

       // Lot of code...

       bRetVal = TRUE;

    } while (false);

   if(p)
   {
     delete p;
     p= NULL;
   }

   return bRetVal;
}
share|improve this answer

The code you're giving us is (almost) C code written inside a C++ file. The kind of memory cleaning you're using would be Ok in a C program not using C++ code/libraries.

In C++, your code is simply unsafe and unreliable. In C++ the kind of management you're asking for is done differently. Use constructors/destructors. Use smart pointers. Use stack. In a word, use RAII.

Your code could (i.e., in C++, SHOULD) be written as:

BOOL foo()
{
   BOOL bRetVal = FALSE;

   std::auto_ptr<int> p = new int;

   // Lot of code...

   return bRetVal ;
}

(note that new-ing a int is somewhat silly in real code, but you can replace int by any kind of object, and then, it makes more sense). Let's imagine we have an object of type T (T could be an int, some C++ class, etc.). Then the code becomes:

BOOL foo()
{
   BOOL bRetVal = FALSE;

   std::auto_ptr<T> p = new T;

   // Lot of code...

   return bRetVal ;
}

or even better, using the stack:

BOOL foo()
{
   BOOL bRetVal = FALSE;

   T p ;

   // Lot of code...

   return bRetVal ;
}

Anyway, any of the above examples are magnitudes more easy to read and secure than your example.

RAII has many facets (i.e. using smart pointers, the stack, using vectors instead of variable length arrays, etc.), but all in all is about writing as little code as possible, letting the compiler clean the stuff at the right moment.

share|improve this answer

Alien01 wrote: Currently I am working on a project where goto statements are heavely used. The main purpose of goto statements is to have one cleanup section in routine rather than multiple return statements.

I other words, you want to separate the program logic from simple repetitive tedious routines like freeing a resource which might be reserved in different locations of code.

Exception Handling technique is an error handling logic which works in parallel with program logic, it's a more elegant solution since it provides such separation while offering the ability to move control to other blocks of code exactly as the goto statement does, so I modified your script to look like this:

class auxNullPtrException : public std::exception {
public:
    auxNullPtrException::auxNullPtrException()
    	: std::exception( " OOM \n") {}
};
BOOL foo()
{
   BOOL bRetVal = FALSE;
   try{ 
       int *p=NULL;
       p = new int;
       if(p==NULL)
       {
    	 throw auxNullPtrException();
       }
    	// Lot of code...
    }
    catch( auxNullPtrException & _auxNullPtrException )
    {
    	std::cerr<<_auxNullPtrException.what();
    	if(p)
    	{
    	 delete p;
    	 p= NULL;
    	}
    }
   return bRetVal;
}
share|improve this answer

I think using the goto for exit code is bad since there's a lot of other solutions with low overhead such as having an exit function and returning the exit function value when needed. Typically in member functions though, this shouldn't be needed, otherwise this could be indication that there's a bit too much code bloat happening.

Typically, the only exception I make of the "no goto" rule when programming is when breaking out of nested loops to a specific level, which I've only ran into the need to do when working on mathematical programming.

For example:

for(int i_index = start_index; i_index >= 0; --i_index)
{
    for(int j_index = start_index; j_index >=0; --j_index)
        for(int k_index = start_index; k_index >= 0; --k_index)
            if(my_condition)
                goto BREAK_NESTED_LOOP_j_index;
BREAK_NESTED_LOOP_j_index:;
}
share|improve this answer

I don't know where this thing about goto come from...

In compiled language each and every conditionnal instructions (if / switch / for / while etc) resolve in "cmp" "jmp" or "j??" in machine code(jmp IS goto) In fact, a really well optimised code is aware of best execution paths and MUST therefore use "goto".. It's even better to do a linear peace of code with gotos than methods and calls when stack is not used ("call" = "push"+"jmp").

There's absolutly no good reason why you shouldn't use GOTO in C++ : generated code is full of "jmp"s everywhere anyway.

It's only a problem in scripts (where it is often not available), because the destination of goto has not necessarily been interpreted when goto instruction is.

The initial argument against goto is that the code is harder to check. That's absurd : A code is not made to be checked (or only ONCE) : it's made to be executed, to be small and fast. A optimized peace of code must avoid redundancy (by reusing the same instructions) and avoid runtime checks (exceptions that are not related to hardware malfunctions should all be avoided at design time, NOT at runtime).

share|improve this answer
1  
Modern code is made to be readable, predictable and maintainable. Goto is often (but not always) a sign that this code is not. But it is silly to assert it "is not made to be checked." Most software development these days does involve code reviews. –  phord Sep 21 '12 at 22:27

protected by Bo Persson Sep 11 '12 at 17:47

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.