Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a common interface for cin and file input?

I want to make a program that has an optional parameter

prog [input-file]

If an input file is specified, then it should read from the file, and if not, it should read from cin.

From what I can tell, they both implement istream. How would you set up it so that I could do something like in >> var, where in is an istream.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    std::ifstream f;
    if (argc >= 2) {
        f.open(argv[1]);
    }
    std::istream &in = (argc >= 2) ? f : std::cin;

    // use in here
}

You could shift some of this work into a helper class to make it clearer what's going on (note that this has slightly different behavior in the case where the file can't be opened):

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

class ifstream_or_cin_t {
    std::ifstream f;

public:
    ifstream_or_cin_t(const char *filename)
    {
        if (filename) {
            f.open(filename);
        }
    }

    operator std::istream &() { return f.is_open() ? f : std::cin; }
};

static void do_input(std::istream &in)
{
    // use in...
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    do_input(
        ifstream_or_cin_t((argc >= 2) ? argv[1] : NULL));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Snap. :-) I did the same. –  Loki Astari Sep 25 '10 at 1:22
    
@Martin & @dave: While this is certainly right, I very much prefer James answer. Decomposing problems (deciding where to read from vs. actually doing the reading) into functions makes code so much easier to read. –  sbi Sep 25 '10 at 10:32
    
@sbi How's that for decomposition? ;) –  dave Sep 25 '10 at 13:56
    
For one, I'm not a fan of introducing classes for algorithms. Algorithms are best implemented as functions, and classes are good suited to store objects, that is: a state (member data) plus operations (member functions). Picking a stream is an algorithm. But that might just be my preferences. The second problem is less disputable: if you can't open the file, this code will silently read from the console. Imagine a user mistyping a filename and then sitting and staring at the blinking prompt, not knowing what to make of it! –  sbi Sep 25 '10 at 16:45
    
@sbi, @James: After thinking about it I do prefer James version for the simpler types of program. But I would need to think some more for situations where there were a large number of command line arguments that needed to be parsed (which you generally don't do in main). –  Loki Astari Sep 25 '10 at 18:18

You can write a function that takes a reference to an std::istream:

void do_input(std::istream& the_istream)
{
    int my_awesome_variable;
    the_istream >> my_awesome_variable;
}

Usage example:

int main()
{
    // reading from stdin:
    do_input(std::cin);

    // reading from a file:
    std::ifstream fs("test.txt");
    do_input(fs);
}
share|improve this answer
istream& input = cin;

or

inputFileStream ifstream(fileName);
istream& input = inputFileStream;

However I think that this is not a very good method since cin doesn't have a close() whereas ifstream does.

share|improve this answer
1  
You cannot retarget a reference; even if you fixed the glaring syntactic errors, input = inputFileStream cannot work. Concerning close(), usually you don't have to call close() anyway; you just let the destructor handle it. –  James McNellis Sep 24 '10 at 23:54
    
Meant for those two to be two separate code blocks. –  Novikov Sep 25 '10 at 0:01

My 2P worth:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>

extern char const* findFlag(int,char*[],char const*);
int main(int argc,char* argv[])
{
    std::string     isFile  = findFlag(argc,argv,"-f");
    std::ifstream   file;

    if (isFile != "")
    {   file.open(isFile.c_str());
    }
    std::istream&   data    = isFile != "" ? file : std::cin;


}
share|improve this answer
    
Just a minor stylistic point... Because with ordinary c-strings a == or != comparison will not work, I prefer to explicitly create an std::string from a c-string when I am comparing them. –  San Jacinto Sep 25 '10 at 14:02
    
@San Jacinto: I understand your point in the general case. But I think x == "" is actually clearer than x == std::string(""). –  Loki Astari Sep 25 '10 at 18:13
    
Wouldn't that better be !isFile.empty()? –  sbi Sep 25 '10 at 20:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.