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I am building a project which uses jQuery UI for the client side. My goal is to have my web-app never do a postback and do everything client side.

While developing though I found almost all my code goes into 1 .js file and 1 .html file where I have a lot of div's which I show and hide when appropriate.

Is there a better way to organize this? Is an oldschool server side include the best way to do this? Also is there a way to have 2 javascript files be able to see contents from within one another? I think how it works only the second one can call things from the first one.

I'm just not sure about the best way to scale because I'm used to building client side applications which have many source files.

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You might want to look into Dojo, which has a lot of features for larger applications way beyond the functionality that jQuery is designed to provide. –  Pointy Sep 25 '10 at 0:10
    
I agree with @Pointy that you might need something with more oomph, but recommend Sproutcore as it is a html5 application framework. –  hvgotcodes Sep 25 '10 at 0:44

3 Answers 3

I assume "my web-app never do a postback" means you will use AJAX :)
There's no difference in using AJAX or server calls but I prefer the use of AJAX to keep a neat UI.

Now, after reading your post, you need to know something.

You have these two files:

file1.js

var a = 'Cheers'; 
var b = ' and beers';

file2.js

alert(a + b);

To include this files in your html file

<script type="text/javascript" src="file1.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="file2.js"></script>

is the same thing as doing

<script type="text/javascript">
  var a = 'Cheers'; 
  var b = ' and beers';
</script>
<script type="text/javascript">
  alert(a + b);
</script>

And this, in fact, is the same as doing

<script type="text/javascript">
  var a = 'Cheers'; 
  var b = ' and beers';
  alert(a + b);
</script>

Notice that inversing the order of the source files like this

<script type="text/javascript" src="file2.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="file1.js"></script>

will generate

<script type="text/javascript">
  alert(a + b);
  var a = 'Cheers'; 
  var b = ' and beers';
</script>

and you will get a runtime excepcion (a is undefined).

So, yes, you can have multiple js files, and organize your code.
I usually do it having a single javascript class in a file, like in Java.

Good Luck :)

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Similar to Hvgotcodes, its best to keep all your classes in seperate files whilst in development. I follow a simple rule of one class per file. When you are ready to go to production you can concatinate all your scripts together.

Javascript will automatically be able to see content in other scripts, i.e.

<script src="firstScript.js"></script>
<script src='canReadPreviousScripts.js"></script>

As far as I know if the files are class based, then they can reference each other freely, but if the code is procedurally coded then they have to be loaded in the right order.

I've been working on a medium sized js only app which can be viewed here: http://explore.travellr.com

If you check the source you can see there are over a dozen files, as this is still in development. Once its ready for production, the files (except the framework, MooTools) will be concatenated, and zipped.

Hope this helps!

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You probably want to try and modularize your jquery functionality into plugins. Everything in one file is usually not a good idea.

I also think you are going to need a server for some things. For example if a user has two computers and wants to use your app on both, they are going to need a way to sync the 'state' of your application. But without knowing specifically what you are doing its impossible to say for sure...

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Although if he puts all his functions into one file he gets to call it a library. That's got to count for something... =) –  David Thomas Sep 25 '10 at 0:48
    
if all the functions are related, sure. If there are completely random, well, hmm.... –  hvgotcodes Sep 25 '10 at 1:25

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