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hide an entry from Toc in latex

Appendix
 A Section 1
     A.1 Subsection 1
     A.2 Subsection 2
 B Section 2

Is there a way to get rid of Subsection n, but still have the subsection numbered in the document (i.e. not using \subsection*)?

I thought about limiting the TOC depth, but that does not seem to be possible for just the Appendix?

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marked as duplicate by Gunther Struyf, George Stocker Aug 21 '12 at 23:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
why do you want to do this? (is there some underlying problem that may be easier to solve in latex?) –  second Sep 27 '10 at 8:47
    
It's just university guidelines... –  HTTPeter Sep 27 '10 at 15:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Here's one (sort of hackish but not too bad) way to work this:

All wrapped up, you just add a new command hiddensubsection, given by

\newcommand{\hiddensubsection}[1]{
    \stepcounter{subsection}
    \subsection*{\arabic{chapter}.\arabic{section}.\arabic{subsection}\hspace{1em}{#1}}
}

Then you create your notoc subsection using this instead of \subsection:

\hiddensubsection{sectionname}

The way it works is by manually incrementing the subsection counter and then creating an unnumbered subsection with the subsection counter as part of the title. You may need to tweak the spacing between number and title, but i couldn't see any difference.

Obviously you could do the same thing for sections and subsubsections if needed

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What do you do if the * operator doesn't work. For me, its using "*" as the actual title and treating the actual heading like regular text in a new paragraph. –  Safayet Ahmed Apr 13 '14 at 21:18

you might find this so question helpful

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quite close, but this also affects the layout of subsections (the below spacing is totally wrong). –  HTTPeter Sep 27 '10 at 0:43
    
I think your post should be a comment on the original question or the accepted answer, not an answer it self. –  lindhe Oct 17 '14 at 8:36

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