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Create a method that:

Given a string, look for a mirror image (backwards) string at both the beginning and end of the given string. In other words, zero or more characters at the very beginning of the given string, and at the very end of the string in reverse order (possibly overlapping). For example, the string "abXYZba" has the mirror end "ab".

Examples

mirrorEnds("abXYZba") → "ab" 
mirrorEnds("abca") → "a"  
mirrorEnds("aba") → "aba"

Java solution:

public String mirrorEnds(String string) 
{
  boolean matches = true;
  StringBuilder mirror = new StringBuilder();
  int i = 0;
  int length = pString.length();

  while (matches && i < length) 
  {
    if (pString.charAt(i) == pString.charAt(length-i-1))
       mirror.append(pString.charAt(i));
    else
       matches = false;

    i++; 
   }

   String str = mirror.toString(); 
   return str;
}
share|improve this question
3  
You don't even need a string builder. Just use string.substring(0, i) at the end. And use a break instead of having a separate matches flag. –  casablanca Sep 25 '10 at 2:15
5  
Guys, I think author meant algorithmically different solutions, not "let's translate this to every language on Earth!". Vote to close. –  Nikita Rybak Sep 25 '10 at 2:44
3  
Is this meant to be a code-golf? –  David Thomas Sep 25 '10 at 3:35
1  
Maybe this should be tagged "language-agnostic" rather than with a tag for every language. –  MAK Sep 25 '10 at 8:05
    
Sounds like a partial palindrome... –  crowne Nov 4 '10 at 19:20
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26 Answers 26

C++

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
std::string mirrorEnds(const std::string& in)
{
    return std::string(in.begin(),
                       mismatch(in.begin(), in.end(), in.rbegin()).first);
}
int main()
{
    std::cout << mirrorEnds("abXYZba") << '\n'
              << mirrorEnds("abca") << '\n'
              << mirrorEnds("aba") << '\n';
}

EDIT: Since people are asking: in C++, any sequence can be represented as a pair of iterators, and any pair of iterators can become a sequence again. Here, the string in is viewed through the pair of iterators in.begin()...in.end() which present a view of the sequence going forward, and the same string in is viewed through a pair of iterators in.rbegin()...in.rend(), which represent a view of the sequence going backwards. std::mismatch() compares the two sequences that are given to it, element by element, until it finds a mismatch, which it returns as an iterator. Then the pair of iterators in.begin()...<return of mismatch> are viewed as a string again, and that string is returned.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: That's beautifully concise. –  Mark Elliot Sep 25 '10 at 2:44
    
can you put some words to explain the mismatch() call? not familiar with std –  Chii Sep 25 '10 at 2:52
    
@chii: "Return first position where two ranges differ" cplusplus.com/reference/algorithm/mismatch/&pws=0 –  IfLoop Sep 25 '10 at 3:01
    
+1: That's beautifully concise. Nice use of the STL. –  André Caron Sep 25 '10 at 3:26
1  
+1: I was thinking this was a text-book application of reverse iterators. Did not leave disappointed. –  Boojum Sep 25 '10 at 3:52
show 3 more comments

C#

Func<string, string> mirrorEnds =
    s => new string(s.Reverse().TakeWhile((c, i) => c == s[i]).ToArray());

For completeness, here was my initial take on it:

Func<string, string> mirrorEnds =
    s => new string(s.Zip(s.Reverse(), (a, b) => new { a, b })
                     .TakeWhile(c => c.a == c.b)
                     .Select(c => c.a).ToArray());

I changed it once I saw how close it was to Jorg's solution.

share|improve this answer
    
The first thing I thought of was the Zip->Reverse->TakeWhile->Select, so I wrote it only to discover 5 other solutions doing the exact same thing. Thus, I came up with a more creative (and shorter) solution. –  Gabe Sep 25 '10 at 2:57
    
+1 for linq. +1 for single line. +2 for simplicity. –  BrunoLM Sep 25 '10 at 2:59
2  
time to learn this C# –  Cubbi Sep 25 '10 at 3:23
    
exceeds even most of the functional languages in conciseness. nice. –  sreservoir Sep 25 '10 at 3:55
4  
Very nice solution. +1. BTW: the reason why the Zip(Reverse).TakeWhile.Select is so popular, is probably because it is a direct 1:1 translation of the problem statement. Which is why I never understand why people think that code like that is complicated. I write code like that, not because I want to show off how smart I am, but because of how stupid I am. I cannot keep loop indices and termination conditions and off-by-one errors and fencepost errors and iterators straight. So, I simply eliminate them. –  Jörg W Mittag Sep 25 '10 at 4:04
show 3 more comments

Java

public static String mirrorEnds(String s) {
    int i = 0;
    while (i < s.length() && s.charAt(i) == s.charAt(s.length() - 1 - i))
        i++;
    return s.substring(0, i);
}
share|improve this answer
4  
Whoooaaa....... –  400_the_cat Sep 25 '10 at 2:44
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Ruby

class String
  def mirror_ends
    chars.zip(chars.reverse_each).take_while {|a, b| a == b }.map(&:first).join
  end
end

Testsuite:

require 'test/unit'
class TestMirrorEnds < Test::Unit::TestCase
  def test_that_abXYZba_mirror_ends_is_ab
    assert_equal 'ab', 'abXYZba'.mirror_ends
  end
  def test_that_abca_mirror_ends_is_a
    assert_equal 'a', 'abca'.mirror_ends
  end
  def test_that_aba_mirror_ends_is_aba
    assert_equal 'aba', 'aba'.mirror_ends
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Haha very nice. –  Tony Ennis Sep 25 '10 at 3:23
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C

  char *mirrorEnds(char *s)
  {
    char *a;
    for (a=s+strlen(s) ; *s && *s==*(a-1) ; s++,a--);
    return a;
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Why not for (a=s+strlen(s)-1; *s && *s&==*a; ..etc –  WW. Sep 25 '10 at 4:31
    
Nice! I like the way you return the substring. –  Gabe Sep 25 '10 at 4:31
    
@WW the change you propose does not work: the returned a would be 1 before the actual position. Thus not working for xyx or showing tx in xytx (or would return x in aaax which is incorrect) –  ring0 Sep 25 '10 at 4:42
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Haskell (somebody reformat this for me):

mirrorEnds a = map fst $ takeWhile (uncurry (==)) $ zip a (reverse a)

mirrorEnds a = zipWith const a $ takeWhile id $ zipWith (==) a (reverse a)

I actually like the second better.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd write the first as mirrorEnds = ... $ zip . reverse (points-free style rules). +1 for Haskell. –  delnan Sep 28 '10 at 13:37
    
@delnan doesn't work on account of using a repeatedly; we'd have to introduce another combinator. –  sreservoir Sep 3 '13 at 22:25
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Common Lisp

(defun mirror-ends (string)
  (loop for i upfrom 0
        for j downfrom (1- (length string))
        while (and (<= i j) (char= (aref string i) (aref string j)))
        finally (return (subseq string 0 i))))
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for lisp. See xkcd.com/297 –  Tony Ennis Sep 25 '10 at 3:27
1  
Is that the most concise way to do this in Lisp? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Sep 25 '10 at 6:25
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Java

alternative

Didn't see the StringUtils version yet...

  String mirrorEnds(String s) {
    return StringUtils.getCommonPrefix(new String[] { s, s.reverse() });
  }
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C#

public static string MirrorEnds(this string s)
{
    return String.Join(
        "", from p in s.Zip(s.Reverse(), (a, b) => new { a, b }).
            TakeWhile(p => p.a == p.b) select p.a
    );
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Masterful! Well done! –  p.campbell Sep 25 '10 at 2:52
    
+1 for linq. +1 for single line. +1 for simplicity. –  BrunoLM Sep 25 '10 at 2:54
    
Now that I noticed the extension method, +1 for that too. Indeed Masterful. –  BrunoLM Sep 25 '10 at 3:08
2  
@BrunoLM: I'm glad you like it, especially since I don't actually know C#. –  Jörg W Mittag Sep 25 '10 at 4:05
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Scala

def mirrorEnds(s: String) =
  s.zip(s.reverse).takeWhile {p => p._1 == p._2}.map {_._1}.mkString
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Ruby

Inspired by @Sheldon L. Cooper's Java solution:

class String
  def mirror_ends
    chars.take_while.with_index {|c, i| c == self[-i-1] }.join
  end
end

Testsuite:

require 'test/unit'
class TestMirrorEnds < Test::Unit::TestCase
  def test_that_abXYZba_mirror_ends_is_ab
    assert_equal 'ab', 'abXYZba'.mirror_ends
  end
  def test_that_abca_mirror_ends_is_a
    assert_equal 'a', 'abca'.mirror_ends
  end
  def test_that_aba_mirror_ends_is_aba
    assert_equal 'aba', 'aba'.mirror_ends
  end
end
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Tcl

The clearest way to do this I can think of is to convert the string into a list and compare with its reverse:

proc mirrorEnds {txt} {
    set x [split $txt {}]
    set y [lreverse $x]

    set mirror ""

    foreach a $x b $y {
        if {$a == $b} {
            append mirror $a
        } else {
            break
        }
    }

    return $mirror
}

Alternatively, you can do the standard iterate-from-both-directions thing. But it's more verbose:

proc mirrorEnds {txt} {
    set mirror ""

    for {set i 0} {$i < [string length $txt]} {incr i} {
        if {[string index $txt $i] == [string index $txt end-$i]} {
            append mirror [string index $txt $i]
        } else {
            break
        }
    }

    return $mirror
}
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C#

Here's a more conventional approach:

static string mirrorEnds(string strIn)
{
    string strOut = "";
    for (int i = 0, j = strIn.Length - 1; j >= 0 && strIn[i] == strIn[j]; i++, --j)
        strOut += strIn[i];
    return strOut;
}

And probably the fastest method:

static string mirrorEnds(string strIn)
{
    int i = 0, j = strIn.Length - 1;
    for (; j >= 0 && strIn[i] == strIn[j]; i++, --j) ;
    return strIn.Substring(0, i);
}
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XQuery

substring($s,1,min(let $c := string-to-codepoints($s)
                   return for $x at $p in $c
            where $x != $c[last() - $p + 1]
            return $p))
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for novelty. Also interesting, because we have seen some LINQ already, and XQuery is where it got its syntax from. –  Jörg W Mittag Sep 25 '10 at 20:34
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Delphi

function MirrorEnds(s: string): string;
var
  i, halfway: integer;
begin
  Result := '';
  halfway := Round((Length(s) / 2) - (1/2));  //halfway pt, rounded down
  for i := 1 to halfway do
    if s[Length(s)-i+1] = s[i] then
      Result := Result + s[i];
  if Length(Result) = halfway then
    Result := s;
end;

Or if you prefer a more code-golfy method (i.e., sacrifice performance for brevity) then you can do this:

function MirrorEnds(s: string): string;
var
  i: integer;
begin
  Result := '';
  for i := 1 to Length(s) do
    if ReverseString(s)[i] = s[i] then
      Result := Result + s[i]
    else
      Break;
end;

And finally, a brief test on my machine indicates that the first one is in fact about five times faster than the second one (although both are virtually instantaneous in practice):

Input string:"abcdefghijklmnopponmlkjihgfedcba"
# of iterations: 900000

Brief = 4973 ms
Fast = 1057 ms
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Python:

from itertools import takewhile
def mirrorEnds(s):
    return ''.join(a for a, b in takewhile(lambda p: p[0] == p[1], zip(s, reversed(s))))
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Perl

sub mirrorEnds {
  my ($a)=@_;
  my ($i,$b);
  for $i (1..length $a) {
    if (substr($a,0,$i) eq reverse(substr($a,-$i))) {
      $b = substr($a,0,$i);
    }
  }
  $b
}
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Java

Here's one way.

public static String reversi(String s) {
    StringBuffer sb2 = new StringBuffer(s).reverse();

    int i = 0;
    while (i < s.length() && s.charAt(i) == sb2.charAt(i)) i++;
    return i>0 ? s.substring(0, i) : "";
}
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PHP

$rev=str_split(strrev($str));
$mirror='';
foreach($rev as $k=>$v) {
    if($str[$k]==$v) {
        $mirror.=$v;
    } else {
        break;
    }
}
echo $mirror;
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Python

alternative

def mirror_ends(string):
    return ''.join(string[i] for i in range(len(string)//2) if string[i] == string[-i-1])

>>> mirror_ends("abxyzba")
'ab'
share|improve this answer
    
Incorrect code. Wrong results e.g. for 'abxccyba'. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 4 '10 at 19:23
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GAWK-SED-SHELL Oneliner

echo string | sed 's/./& /g' | gawk '{ for(j=1; j<NF/2; j++) if($j==$(NF-j+1)) print $j; else break}' | tr -d "\n"

where string is the string to process.

share|improve this answer
    
Calling this a one-liner is a stretch... –  JosephStyons Nov 19 '10 at 2:24
    
@JosephStyons: Why? –  athena Nov 19 '10 at 8:09
    
i think the general rule of thumb is one statement per line. Many of the examples on this page would be "one-liners" if they simply removed the carriage returns. –  JosephStyons Nov 19 '10 at 14:59
    
@JosephStyons: Afaik, pipes are allowed. –  athena Nov 24 '10 at 20:13
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My Java Implementation

  public static String mirrorEnds(String in) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    char[] chars = in.toCharArray();
    int length = chars.length - 1;

    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
        if (chars[i] == chars[length - i]) {
            sb.append(chars[i]);
        } else {
            break;
        }
    }

    return sb.toString();
}
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Scheme

(define (equal-start? a b)
  (and
    (pair? a)
    (pair? b)
    (equal? (car a) (car b))))

(define (take-while-equal-start a b)
  (if (equal-start? a b)
      (cons
        (car a)
        (take-while-equal-start (cdr a) (cdr b)))
      '()))

(define (mirror-ends str)
  (let ((lst (string->list str)))
    (list->string
      (take-while-equal-start lst (reverse lst)))))

> (mirror-ends "abXYZba")
"ab"
> (mirror-ends "abca")
"a"
> (mirror-ends "aba")
"aba"
> (mirror-ends "")
""
> (mirror-ends "a")
"a"

Edit: Using SRFI-13, much shorter:

(require "srfi-13")

(define (mirror-ends str)
  (substring
    str
    0
    (string-prefix-length
      str
      (list->string (reverse (string->list str))))))
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A Common Lisp solution, using the 'series package: http://series.sourceforge.net/

(defun mirror-ends (str)
  (let ((str-forward (series:scan 'string str))
        (str-reverse (series:scan 'string (reverse str))))
   (series:collect 'string
    (series:until
     (series:mapping ((a str-forward) (b str-reverse)) (char/= a b))
     str-forward))))
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D

import std.stdio;
import std.string;

string mirrorEnds(string s)
{
    string r;

    foreach (i, c; s.dup.reverse)
        if (s[i] == c)
            r ~= c;
        else
            break;

    return r;
}

void main()
{
    writeln(mirrorEnds("abXYZba"));
    writeln(mirrorEnds("abca"));
    writeln(mirrorEnds("aba"));
}

Or...

import std.algorithm;
import std.stdio;

string mirrorEnds(string s)
{
    return commonPrefix(s, s.dup.reverse);
}

void main()
{
    writeln(mirrorEnds("abXYZba"));
    writeln(mirrorEnds("abca"));
    writeln(mirrorEnds("aba"));
}
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Here is another one in JAVA

public String mirrorEnds(String str) {
  String res="";
  int count=str.length()-1;

  for(int i=0;i<str.length();i++)
  {
    if(str.charAt(i)==str.charAt(count))
      res+=str.substring(i,i+1);
      else
        break;
     count--;
  }   

  return res; 
}
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