Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a struct with many char array like this (and it works) :

struct maytinh {
    char tenmay[10];
    char mamay[10];
    char test[10];
    float manhinh;
    int gia;
};

But if its like this,

struct maytinh {
    char tenmay[99];
    char mamay[99];
    char test[99];
    float manhinh;
    int gia;
};

it breaks when I compile and scanf data in. Moreover when I put another array in the struct, it also breaks:

struct maytinh {
    char tenmay[10];
    char mamay[10];
    char test[10];
    char test2[10];
    float manhinh;
    int gia;
};

Why? (I'm compiling with c-free 4.0)

Here is the scanf code :

void main() {
    int n,i;
    printf("input :");
    scanf("%d",&n);
    struct maytinh a[n];
    for (i=1;i<=n;i++) {    
        printf("May tinh so: %d\n",i);
        printf("Nhap ten may :");
        scanf("%s",a[i].tenmay);
        printf("Nhap ma may :");
        scanf("%s",a[i].mamay);
        printf("Nhap test :");
        scanf("%s",a[i].test);
        printf("Nhap kich thuoc man hinh:");
        scanf("%d",&a[i].gia);
    };
}

this code totally work with the first struct. here is my fix for dynamic size struct array with malloc() and typedef (just for someone like me in need):

typedef struct maytinh {
    char tenmay[99];
    char mamay[99];
    char test[99];
    char test3[99];
    float manhinh;
    int gia;
};
void main(){
    int n,i;
    printf("input :");
    scanf("%d",&n);
    maytinh *a;
    a=(maytinh*)malloc(n*sizeof(maytinh));
    for (i=0;i<=n;i++) {    
    printf("May tinh so: %d\n",i);
    printf("Nhap ten may :");
    scanf("%s",a[i].tenmay);
    printf("Nhap ma may :");
    scanf("%s",a[i].mamay);
    printf("Nhap test :");
    scanf("%s",a[i].test);
    printf("Nhap kich thuoc man hinh:");
    scanf("%d",&a[i].gia);
    };
}
share|improve this question
3  
What does your scanf() call(s) look like? –  Jeff Mercado Sep 25 '10 at 6:08
    
Please provide your code with examples of how you use this struct and the scanf code. –  JoshD Sep 25 '10 at 6:10
    
Please show the minimal amount of code that demonstrates the problem –  Eli Bendersky Sep 25 '10 at 6:10
    
void main(){ int n,i; printf("input :"); scanf("%d",&n); struct maytinh a[n]; for (i=1;i<=n;i++) { printf("May tinh so: %d\n",i); printf("Nhap ten may :"); scanf("%s",a[i].tenmay); printf("Nhap ma may :"); scanf("%s",a[i].mamay); printf("Nhap test :"); scanf("%s",a[i].test); printf("Nhap kich thuoc man hinh:"); scanf("%d",&a[i].gia); }; } –  Singgum3b Sep 25 '10 at 6:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In addition to ring0's answer, the size or the amount of the arrays in your structure shouldn't matter. You should just be aware that even if you allocate characters in your array, it doesn't stop people from typing in longer strings (i.e., buffer overflow). You should always set a length to the scanf() formats to ensure that it doesn't overflow. This is done by adding the length-1 in %s.

Also assuming c-free 4.0 supports dynamic arrays, you need to use malloc() to allocate your struct array following Reinderien's advice.

i.e.,

void main() {
    int n,i;
    printf("input :");
    scanf("%d",&n);
    struct maytinh a[n]; /* change to a malloc() call if it doesn't support dynamic arrays */
    for (i=0;i<n;i++) {    
        printf("May tinh so: %d\n",i);
        printf("Nhap ten may :");
        scanf("%9s",a[i].tenmay);
        printf("Nhap ma may :");
        scanf("%9s",a[i].mamay);
        printf("Nhap test :");
        scanf("%9s",a[i].test);
        printf("Nhap kich thuoc man hinh:");
        scanf("%d",&a[i].gia);
    };
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks guys.my head gonna explode if i didn't know how to solve this problem. –  Singgum3b Sep 25 '10 at 7:00
    
"void main()" isnt ANSI C –  user411313 Sep 25 '10 at 19:08

My first guess would be that it fails to allocate larger structs because you're allocating them on the stack instead of with malloc(), though I'd have to see more example code to say for sure.

Edit: Looks like my guess was right. You're using a non-standard extension to C, using a non-constant number to allocate an array. I bet if you replace that with an appropriate malloc call your issue will be fixed.

share|improve this answer
    
i've add the scanf code –  Singgum3b Sep 25 '10 at 6:26
    
You totally right.That save the day ^.^ though i cant get back my mark –  Singgum3b Sep 25 '10 at 6:49
    
An array with a non-constant size is standard C99 and called a variable length array (VLA). I agree that you do not want to use it here given issues like this. –  schot Sep 25 '10 at 6:58

Arrays start at 0 in C

  for (i=1;i<=n;i++) ... a[i] ...

Should be

  for (i=0;i<n;i++) ... a[i] ...

And maybe

  printf("May tinh so: %d\n",i+1);
share|improve this answer
    
yeah, i know that ,but it isn't solve the problem. –  Singgum3b Sep 25 '10 at 6:27
    
Using i from 1 may work if you are lucky, but usually there is will a out of bounds problem, or variables overlapping. You probably had some luck with [10] arrays (small), but you were more likely to meet a problem with bigger [99] arrays. –  ring0 Sep 25 '10 at 6:34
    
actually i do change i from 1 to 0 ,and i tested it.Its still crash after i done with scanf =[ –  Singgum3b Sep 25 '10 at 6:40
    
Starting the array from 1 is definitely wrong. Please make an edit and add the new code below the old code (so that everyone understands). There is something else wrong. –  ring0 Sep 25 '10 at 6:45

I guess you ask it at the right place -- stackoverflow :D

Try to change

struct maytinh a[n];

to

struct maytinh *a = (maytinh*) malloc(sizeof(maytinh) * n);

and insert #include "malloc.h" too.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.