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Here is an image:

When I load this image in different browsers, it shows differently. Take a look at the result:

I spent a lot of time on this, but I can't understand why it happens. I have only theories: something wrong with color profiles, or bad image structure, or something else - maybe special copyright measures?

Why is this happening?

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apparently ie7 and also ie8 –  Randy Sep 25 '10 at 12:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The image is a CMYK image, which IE and Safari apparently do not support. Converting it into an RGB image solved the problem for both Safari and IE.

RGB Version:

RGB version

The color's been changed though, so you'd probably want to run it through Photoshop and edit the color balance to get the colors right.

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See also: zytzagoo.net/rant/cmyk-you-too –  NullUserException Sep 25 '10 at 12:22
    
Thank you. I heard about CMYK, but never imagined that it could cause the problems at the web-sites. –  Victor Kalmaev Sep 25 '10 at 16:42
    
@Vickodin At Stack Overflow, if an answer answers your question, then you should mark it as such, using the green checkmark on the side of each answer. This marks your question as resolved and gives both the answerer and the asker a small reward for doing so. –  Yi Jiang Sep 25 '10 at 16:55
    
@Yi Jiang Thanks for explanations. Done. –  Victor Kalmaev Sep 25 '10 at 20:10

There could be something wrong with the image. Open it in some image editor like GIMP and check if it gives some warnings. Try converting the image to some other format(png?) and see if the browsers render it correctly.

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Answered, see the top. Thanks. –  Victor Kalmaev Sep 25 '10 at 16:43

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