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I put this in my .emacs file:

(custom-set-variables                                                                          
 '(gud-gdb-command-name "gdb --annotate=1")
 '(large-file-warning-threshold nil)
 '(menu-bar-mode t)
 '(shell-dirtrack-verbose nil))
(custom-set-faces                                                                         
 )
(add-hook 'shell-mode-hook 'ansi-color-for-comint-mode-on)

Note the (menu-bar-mode t). When I fire up emacs, I have to M-x menu-bar-mode to get a menu bar. I am running GNU Emacs 22.1.1 (mac-apple-darwin, Carbon Version 1.6.0)

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You should consider upgrading to the latest GNU Emacs: emacsformacosx.com –  phils Sep 25 '10 at 12:38
    
I do get a menu bar with Emacs 22.2.1 on Linux and exactly what you posted in .emacs. So either you have something else in your .emacs that turns off the menu bar or it's a Mac/Carbon-specific issue. –  Gilles Sep 25 '10 at 13:58
    
I tried people's suggestions below; they didn't work, but when I purposely put a bug in the .emacs file so that it wouldn't load all the way (I didn't close a paren) then the menu-bar appeared. Weird. What's the load order for emacs? Are there other default locations that a system-wide .emacs file is being loaded? –  Avery Sep 26 '10 at 0:37
    
Running emacs -q exhibits this same behavior. –  Avery Sep 26 '10 at 0:40
    
default.el (usually located in a site-lisp directory if it is present) is loaded after .emacs, but running emacs -q should stop that. Most likely it is something else specific to the (mac-apple-darwin, Carbon Version 1.6.0) build. –  JSON Sep 29 '10 at 1:05
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should consider upgrading to the latest GNU Emacs:

emacsformacosx.com

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The documentation for the associated function says:

With a numeric argument, if the argument is positive,
turn on menu bars; otherwise, turn off menu bars.

So you could try (menu-bar-mode 1) instead of (menu-bar-mode t)

That said, for me (Emacs 23.2.1), setting this via M-x customize-variable menu-bar-mode results in the same entry in my custom-set-variables as you show there, and it has the desired effect when I restart.

There could be a difference between versions of Emacs, though. Did you type that manually? The recommendation is to only use the customize interface for making changes, as making a mistake might break things. Or possibly one of your other settings is invalid?

(In Emacs 23.2.1 I can't customize a gud-gdb-command-name or shell-dirtrack-verbose variable, for instance. OTOH I would presume it's still possible to customize variables from libraries which are only loaded on demand, so this probably doesn't mean anything.)

You could comment out everything else in your customize-variable if you wanted to check this (but watch out for that final closing parenthesis :)

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Confirmed: C-u 1 M-x menu-bar-mode -> Menu-Bar mode enabled –  leoger Sep 25 '10 at 12:46
    
I tried everything you suggested (modifying the invocation, commenting out other customizations, etc). I'm using the customize interface to edit these things, but none of these suggestions worked. It may be a bug with the specific implementation/platform. –  Avery Sep 26 '10 at 0:34
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I don't think (menu-bar-mode 1) belongs inside of custom-set-variables. Instead, put it outside, just like your call to add-hook:

(custom-set-variables
 '(gud-gdb-command-name "gdb --annotate=1")
 '(large-file-warning-threshold nil)
 '(shell-dirtrack-verbose nil))
(custom-set-faces
 )
(menu-bar-mode 1)
(add-hook 'shell-mode-hook 'ansi-color-for-comint-mode-on)
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I tried this: doesn't work. –  Avery Sep 26 '10 at 0:34
    
Have you tried invoking emacs with "-Q" (assuming that's even possible on OS X)? That will prevent all startup files from loading; if it makes emacs appear with a menu-bar, then you know that some startup file was -preventing- the menu-bar from appearing. I'd try it myself but don't have access to a Mac. –  offby1 Sep 27 '10 at 0:11
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