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While sorting an array for ex: A[5]={1,4,5,3,2} the output must be 1,2,3,4,5 in ascending order. in using the concept of bubble sorting my output is 0,1,2,3,4 what would be the problem in my code

  int A[5]={1,5,3,2,4};
     for(int i=0;i<5;i++){
     for(int j=0;j<5;j++){
     if(A[j]>A[j+1])
     {
      int t=A[j];
      A[j]=A[j+1];
      A[j+1]=t;
     }
     }
    }
     for(i=0;i<5;i++)
     cout<<A[i];
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7  
Perhaps you have indexes mixed up with values? We've no way of knowing because there's no example code provided. –  Jeff Foster Sep 25 '10 at 17:52
3  
unless you show us your code there is no way of knowing. –  Naveen Sep 25 '10 at 17:55
    
-1 post your code –  Sam Miller Sep 25 '10 at 19:40
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5 Answers 5

You need to limit your inner loop to <4:

int A[5]={1,5,3,2,4};
for(int i=0;i<5;i++){
    for(int j=0;j<4;j++){
        if(A[j]>A[j+1])
        {
           int t=A[j];
           A[j]=A[j+1];
           A[j+1]=t;
        } 
    }
}
for(i=0;i<5;i++)
   cout<<A[i];
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Why not use the STL sort?

#include <algorithm>

std::sort(A, A+5);
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1  
The "+5" part is slippery thuogh... If A is an array or vector, then one can write A.size(), but for C-style array the preferred way probably is to #define ARRAYSIZE(A) (sizeof(A)/sizeof(A[0])) and then call std::sort( A, A + ARRAYSIZE(A) ); –  Arun Sep 25 '10 at 19:27
1  
@ArunSaha: hardly. That breaks silently if A is a pointer. If you want to do something like this, use an inline template. Also, I'm not sure why this was downvoted. Seems a sensible answer in the general case. Of course, if the question is a part of a homework assignment or something, the STL version is probably out, but we don't know that. –  jalf Sep 26 '10 at 12:37
    
@jaif: You are right, if A is a pointer then ARRAYSIZE does not work. But, that's changing the problem definition too much, in the problem A was not a pointer :). Also I mentioned .size() can be used whenever possible. BTW, it's not me who downvoted. –  Arun Sep 26 '10 at 15:55
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Perhaps you are printing i instead of A[i] in the printing loop, as in

for( int i = 0; i < N; i++ ) {
    cout << i << ",";          // by mistake, printing i instead of A[i]
}
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Is there a reason you are doing bubble sort, other then trying to learn it? It's one of the slower sorts.

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Why do you want to use the slowest sorting algorithm known to man?

This page has some excellent sorting algorithms: http://www.eternallyconfuzzled.com/tuts/algorithms/jsw_tut_sorting.aspx

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One reason would be, for example, if only one element is added to the end at a time and the array needs to be re-sorted. Please do not assume qsort or mergesort are the best answer to every possible sorting problem. –  MaxVT Sep 26 '10 at 10:54
1  
Believe it or not, but bubble sort is still being taught. I too had to implement it as a freshman. (I refused and handed in an implementation of insertion sort instead.) –  larsmans Sep 26 '10 at 10:56
    
@MaxVT I would never think that. Heapsort is good at the scenario you mention. –  IanC Sep 26 '10 at 18:00
1  
@larsmans good for you! I would have done the same thing. –  IanC Sep 26 '10 at 18:00
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