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There is a C code, which we are trying to convert into C++ code. There were two inheritance hierarchies, which were managed by C through switch..case. That has been converted to use virtual functions in C++. Now at one point these two hierarchies have to get related. For example class A relates to A1, class B relates to B1 .... where A,B,C falls in hierarchy1 and A1, B1, C1 falls in hierarchy2. In C code, this is achieved by storing the tag field(or type field used in switch..case) of hierarchy 2 in A, B, C. Can someone guide me on how to achieve this C++ cleanly?

In C

enum NodeTag1
{
  A_Node
  , B_Node
  ....  
};

enum NodeTag2
{
   A1_Node
   , B1_Node
   ....
};

struct Node
{
   NodeTag1 tag1;
};

struct A
{
     NodeTag1 tag1;
     NodeTag2 tag2;
     ..other members...
};

struct B, C all look the same.

Now assume there are 10 functions(f1, f2..) which use NodeTag1 to do a switch.. case In C++

class Node {  //10 virtual functions (f1,f2 ..)};
class A : public Node { // 10 virtual function( f1, f2.. ) };
class B : public Node { // 10 virtual function( f1, f2.. ) };

Now there is a function like this, that gets called from instances of hierarchy 1.

int decide( NodeTag2 tag2 )
{
   switch(tag2)
   {
      ...
   }
}

How can i achieve this in C++?

Thanks, Gokul.

share|improve this question
1  
It would help to clarify what you are looking to do if you post some sample code of what you are trying to achieve (even if it's slightly pseudocodeish since you don't know exactly what you're looking for). –  James McNellis Sep 26 '10 at 2:15
    
The cleanest way is to leave your working C code alone and just compile it with your C++ compiler. –  xscott Sep 26 '10 at 4:29
    
xscott:: Its not possible, because the functions are already migrated and modified for our needs. –  Gokul Sep 26 '10 at 4:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you dont want to create objects at run time. You can use the following method. with only one time object creation. As you dont need to access members of the classes, single object will do your work;

class A
{

public:

 virtual f()
 {
  printf("A");
 }

 static A* behaveLikeA();

 static A* behaveLikeB();
};

class B : public A
{

public:

 virtual f()
 {
  printf("B");
 }
};

A* A::behaveLikeA()
{
 static A ag;
 return &ag;
}

A* A::behaveLikeB()
{
 static B bg;
 return &bg;
};


int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{

 A* b = A::behaveLikeB();
 b->f();

 b = A::behaveLikeA();
 b->f();
 return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This looks fine. Thanks. –  Gokul Sep 28 '10 at 0:27

If by "relate to" you mean create the common method is the factory method. This is a virtual function in classes A, B and C that returns an object of A1, B1 or C1 resp.

class A  
{
  virtual A1 GetRelated() { return new A1(); };
}

class B: public A
{
  A1 GetRelated() { return new B1(); };
}

class A1;
class B1: public A1;
..

This of course assumes that classes A and A1 are parents of classes B and B1, your hierarchy may be different.

share|improve this answer
    
Creating objects is a slightly costly operation, we would like to avoid. The functions really don't need the members in A1/B1. They just need its type. –  Gokul Sep 26 '10 at 4:41

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