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Some of Oracle's analytic functions allow for a windowing clause to specify a subset of the current partition, using keywords like "unbounded preceding/following", "current row", or "value_expr preceding/following" where value_expr is a physical or logical offset from the current row or value (depending on whether you have specified ROW or RANGE, respectively).

Here is an example using scott/tiger that displays employees in dept 30, and a count of the number of employees in their dept hired before them (including themselves):

select deptno, 
       empno,
       hiredate,
       count(*) over (partition by deptno 
                          order by hiredate
                          range between unbounded preceding and current row) cnt_hired_before1,
       count(*) over (partition by deptno 
                          order by hiredate
                          range between unbounded preceding and 0 preceding) cnt_hired_before2
  from emp
 where deptno = 30
 order by deptno, hiredate;

...can anyone provide an example or documentation where "current row" is different than "0 preceding/following"? It just seems like syntactic sugar to me...

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

It doesn't really matter which you use. They are two different ways of expressing the windowing, but the optimizer will perform the query the same way. The term "current row" is one that is common to multiple databases with analytic functions, not just Oracle. It's more of a stylistic difference, in the same way that some people prefer count(*) over count(1).

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The Oracle documentation that I have to hand (Oracle 9.2) says:

If you specified RANGE:

  • value_expr is a logical offset. It must be a constant or expression that evaluates to a positive numeric value or an interval literal.

This implies that you shouldn't really be using 0 since it isn't a positive numeric value. But, obviously it is possible to use 0 preceding/following since you are.

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It is all about what you're trying to accomplish. You may want to use RANGE BETWEEN/ROWS BETWEEN use it to find LAST_VALUE within the sub-set or compare things within a sub-set. But most certainly you don't need for the example you provided.

    select deptno, 
       empno,
       hiredate,
       count(*) over (partition by deptno, trunc(hiredate,'mm')) cnt_same_month
  from emp
 where deptno = 30
 order by deptno, hiredate
share|improve this answer
    
My example was just to show usage of 0 preceding/following and current row...I wasn't asking for a better way to do that query. Your answer had nothing to do with the question -- is there ever a difference between 0 preceding/following and current row? – jimmyorr Dec 19 '08 at 15:18
    
Of course there's a difference and I said it is all about what you're trying to accomplish. If you want to look at a limited sub-frame around a current row you can use 'range between 3 preceding and 5 following'. But ' range between current row and current row' does not make a sense. – user34850 Dec 19 '08 at 15:27
    
First, I appreciate you trying to help. But to clarify, I'm focusing on ZERO preceding/following and "current row". They seem to do the exact same thing, and I'm wondering if there's any difference, or if Oracle just thought "current row" looked prettier. I'll update my example... – jimmyorr Dec 19 '08 at 15:55

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