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I see that in different plugins and codes, but I don't understand what does that function... In the jQuery api isn't referenced!

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It's not in the jQuery reference, since it's a [ native Javascript function ](developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/…). –  Peter Ajtai Sep 26 '10 at 7:12
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2 Answers 2

up vote 72 down vote accepted

apply calls a function with a set of arguments. It's not part of jQuery, it's part of core Javascript. However, there is mention of it in the jQuery docs:

http://docs.jquery.com/Types#Context.2C_Call_and_Apply

Syntax:

somefunction.apply(thisObj[, argsArray])

The above calls the function somefunction, setting this to thisObj within the function's scope, and passing in the arguments from argsArray as the arguments to the function.

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Related is the [ .call() function ](mdn.beonex.com/en/Core_JavaScript_1.5_Reference/Global_Objects/…) that also takes a this, but it is followed by a series of individually listed arguments instead of an array containing the arguments. –  Peter Ajtai Sep 26 '10 at 7:15
    
what will below do than? $.when.apply(null, object).done(callback); –  user1531437 Jan 12 '13 at 7:07
    
@user1531437 That calls $.when(object).done(callback);, but in the function $.when, this is set to the first parameter, i.e. null. Arguably, one should be using $.when.call(null, object).done(callback); because the second parameter of .apply is supposed to be an array –  Luke Madhanga Jul 7 at 14:03
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Essentially, apply will call a function with the context being set to the object you apply the function to. This means that within the function, referencing this will refer to that object.

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